Southern Cross University visual arts course coordinator Dr Stephen Garrett seated amongst some of the the artworks for this year's SCU art exhibition.
Southern Cross University visual arts course coordinator Dr Stephen Garrett seated amongst some of the the artworks for this year's SCU art exhibition. Marc Stapelberg

Wow factor at SCU's art exhibition

IMAGINE the different sounds of thunder on a stormy night, and then visualise how you would both portray it visually and aurally in a confined space.

That's what Southern Cross University visual arts student Samantha Taylor did as part of her major work.

Three large sheets of different sized and textured metal hung from the ceiling, and with a touch of one of the sheets the sound of thunder reverberated around the small room; touch all three and you have the song of a storm.

"For most of my degree I've been working on very strong visual elements of artistic expression and I got really sick of that,” Ms Taylor said.

In a collaboration with four other artists, it was Ms Taylor's job to record sound for a piece that explored all sensory elements.

"I just fell in love with recording sound and playing it back. I recorded different materials... and I found I really loved sounds of metal and paper (which) make a very surreal sound when played back.

"But it was difficult to express that because I had to use (visual) materials to express sound.”

Visual arts course coordinator Dr Stephen Garrett said large scale photography work, video, printmaking, painting, and installation graces the walls and floors of the space this year as a result of 24 graduating and honours students' artworks.

"There is a compilation of large-scale artworks this year which is quite different to other years where we have handed over quite a lot of room to individual students to realise their work,” Dr Garrett said.

"By the time students get to third year we really encourage them to realise what type of artist they want to be, but also to use their life experience to make their artwork.

He said this year there was quite a number of political works exhibited.

"Someone said they see this exhibition as a type of Trumpian experience - what's happening globally.

"There's a very serious sort of element that's happening in the show this year which we haven't seen in previous years but I think that's partly because students have been given a much more ambitious scale in the way they're working.”

Ms Taylor said she is really excited to exhibit her final works - a result of three years of challenging work.

"I have a starting point to now move on to the future of my art practice,” she said.

The exhibition opening is on Friday November 10 from 5pm, and the exhibition runs from November 11 to 25 from 10am-4pm, Monday - Saturday at the campus.



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