Sabine Schmid, of Lindendale, with daughters Lily Rose, 3, and nine-month-old Emmylou, and Ayumi Hayashi-Zillig with her son Yuki Zillig, 2.
Sabine Schmid, of Lindendale, with daughters Lily Rose, 3, and nine-month-old Emmylou, and Ayumi Hayashi-Zillig with her son Yuki Zillig, 2. Jacklyn Wagner

Women put family on hold

GETTING the hat-trick - career, money and a decent bloke - is proving so elusive for modern women that they're delaying motherhood, according to a study by Relationships Australia, released yesterday.

While more than three-quarters of all women surveyed without children plan to have kids, just 16 per cent said they were thinking about having them now, and two-thirds planned to have kids some time in the future.

Ayumi Hayashi-Zillig, like an increasing number of women, waited until she and her partner were 'financially secure' before having her son at 35.

“We had been together for five years before we were ready to have children.” Ms Hayashi-Zillig said.

She attributed the decision to wait partly to her Japanese background which put an emphasis on career and financial security.

“I was concerned when I was pregnant that I left it too late because at 35 biologically you are an 'older mother'.”

Ms Hayashi-Zillig, now 37, was ambivalent about having any more.

For Sabine Schmid, who had her first daughter when she was 30 - the national average age - it was a 'very good age'. She said all the mothers that she knew who had their babies younger either 'had a lot of courage' or didn't plan on motherhood.

According to the Relationships Australia survey, more than half of Gen X women, aged 30-39, said they hadn't found their right partner”, half were concerned about the cost of kids, and almost one quarter were concerned about their loss of freedom.

Only 17 per cent of this age group said their career was more important.

The study also found almost two-thirds of Gen Y women, those aged 18-29, said they would delay having kids now as they were concerned about the cost.

Chief executive officer of Relationships Australia, Anne Hollonds, said the survey highlighted the importance of working on relationships.

“If you're not sure about the quality of your relationship, don't leave it to chance,” she said.



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