After spending two nights lost in near-freezing bushland and a third night in hospital, Will Callaghan can finally sleep in his own bed tonight.
After spending two nights lost in near-freezing bushland and a third night in hospital, Will Callaghan can finally sleep in his own bed tonight.

Will finally home after bushland ordeal

William Callaghan will finally sleep in his own bed tonight after surivivng two nights lost in near-freezing Victorian bushland.

The boy, 14, was discharged from Melbourne's Royal Children's Hospital this afternoon, after he spent the night being treated for cuts and abrasions and a suspected broken foot. Doctors also needed to remove an insect from his ear.

Will's mum Penny Callaghan told reporters outside the hospital this morning he'd had good sleep in hospital after enjoying a dinner of chicken nuggets and chips.

Will is carried into an ambulance after he was found on Wednesday. Picture: David Crosling
Will is carried into an ambulance after he was found on Wednesday. Picture: David Crosling

"This is a massive ordeal for him, but to him it was probably just an adventure as well," she said.

"He's just happy, I think, that I'm there. He slept pretty well last night. A lot better than I did."

Will managed to survive two difficult nights lost at Mt Disappointment as temperatures plunged to near 0C after he became separated from his family during a walk on Monday.

Hundreds of search crews and volunteers staged a massive two-day search in thick bushland for the boy, who was eventually found on Wednesday by a bushwalker.

Will’s mum relieved Penny thanks rescuers after her son was found. Picture: David Crosling
Will’s mum relieved Penny thanks rescuers after her son was found. Picture: David Crosling

Earlier, Professor Robyn Young from Flinders University, who works with children on the autism spectrum, told news.com.au why she believed Will had managed to survive the ordeal despite life-threatening conditions.

"His autism meant he was at risk (of not being found) because he wasn't responding by name and he was upset by helicopters flying overhead but at the same time there were a number of things that were protecting him," Prof Young said.

"Much of them relate to hypersensitivity and hyposensitivity - basically they have a high pain threshold.

"We're not sure if they don't feel it or don't respond to it but I've seen kids that have walked around with broken bones."

Originally published as Will finally home after bushland ordeal



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