The Chronicle asked DES why freshwater from the island couldn't be used in the firefighting efforts.
The Chronicle asked DES why freshwater from the island couldn't be used in the firefighting efforts.

Why island’s freshwater is off limits to fire bombers

FIREFIGHTERS have been restricted from using Fraser Island's freshwater resources in because of "biosecurity and cultural" reasons.

That's the word from Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service which says it has engaged with the Butchulla Aboriginal Corporation since the beginning of the fire.

"Biosecurity and cultural reasons restrict waterbombing helicopters from accessing the island's pristine freshwater lakes," A DES spokesman said.

"This prevents pest fish, insects, seeds or pest plant species potentially being transferred from a farm dam via waterbombing buckets, which could be catastrophic to the island's natural ecological balance.

"However, helicopters have sourced water from other sources."
Queensland Fire and Emergency Services announced it had dropped more than 1 million litres of water and gel on the flames since Saturday.

On Tuesday, a prepare to leave warning was issued for Kingfisher Bay Resort as the fire crept closer to the popular accommodation provider.

That warning remained current on Wednesday.

QFES has advised that conditions could worsen during the day.

Extensive waterbombing on Tuesday was effective in slowing the fire.

Waterbombing is planned to continue throughout Wednesday.

Call triple-0 if your property comes under threat.



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