Coastal erosion remains an issue in Byron Bay
Coastal erosion remains an issue in Byron Bay

Sandbagging works continue at Byron Bay beach

Update 3.30pm: NSW CROWN Land continues sandbagging works at Clarkes Beach to avoid further erosion.

A spokesman for the NSW Government confirmed the efforts remain needed at the Byron Bay beach.

"The temporary coastal works are expected to continue for at least another 10 days, dependent on tides and wet weather," he said.

Byron Shire Council Coastal Biodiversity and Sustainability Coordinator Chloe Dowsett said council continues monitoring the situation and working with the NSW Government.

Original story: A BIG 'sand slug' is currently at The Pass in Byron Bay and is expected to move with the tides into Main Beach and Clarkes Beach to repair the coastal areas and stop dune erosion.

Beach access paths at Clarkes Beach at Byron Bay are closed with the recent southerly swell causing more erosion on the beach which is already severely depleted of sand.

In the meantime, contractors for NSW Crown Land have started to fill up geo-bags with sand and place them at Clarke's Beach.

A spokesman for the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (to which NSW Crown Land is part of) confirmed the agency is undertaking coastal protection work at Clarkes Beach at Byron Bay.

The work started Monday afternoon.

"The sandbagging will provide temporary protection for the Beach Byron Bay Cafe until its operation on Crown land at the site can be reconfigured to provide a longer-term solution, including a phased retreat from the current advancing coastal erosion if required," he said.

"The department is working closely with Byron Shire Council, the cafe leaseholder and other stakeholders to ensure public safety is maintained and that the environmental and heritage values of this important site are protected."

He also confirmed the coastal protection work by Crown Lands is restricted to Clarkes Beach.

Byron Shire Council Coastal Biodiversity and Sustainability Coordinator Chloe Dowsett said the 'sand slug' currently at The Pass, needs to move around and refill the other two beaches, but it's hard to predict when will that happen.

 

The 'sand slug' that Main Beach and Clarkes Beach desperately need is currently at The Pass.
The 'sand slug' that Main Beach and Clarkes Beach desperately need is currently at The Pass.

 

The main cause of the current erosion at Clarkes and lack of sand at Main Beach was the lack of sand coming from the eastern area of the bay, she said.

"There has been no main storm events as such that provoked this, but just a few wave events over time that really caused and amplified this erosion," she said.

But why is a government agency working to save a Byron cafe?

The work means some co-ordination among local and state government, as different parts of the area are managed by different agencies:

• Main Beach to Clarkes Beach is managed by council. Council is responsible for ensuring the beach access paths are safe. During erosion events council often closes the paths for safety.

• Byron Beach Cafe is on land that is owned and managed by NSW Crown Lands.

• Reflections Holiday Park at Clarkes Beach is on Crown land that is managed by Reflections. Reflections is responsible for the beach area, to the high tide mark, in front of the holiday park.

• The Pass is in the Cape Byron State Conservation Area that is managed by the National Parks and Wildlife Service.

Click here to see who manages what at The Pass, Main Beach and Clarkes Beach.



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