Kylie, Kayden, 11, Layla, 8, Rylan, 14, Shylah, 6, and Daniel Driver have been home schooling in Albany Creek due to the coronavirus pandemic health restrictions.
Kylie, Kayden, 11, Layla, 8, Rylan, 14, Shylah, 6, and Daniel Driver have been home schooling in Albany Creek due to the coronavirus pandemic health restrictions.

Union question if parents will want their kids in classrooms

QUEENSLAND'S teachers union has questioned if parents will want their students to return to classrooms in the coming weeks.

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk announced on Monday that kindergarten, prep, Years 1, 11 and 12 students would return to classrooms on Monday, May 11 and remaining grades on Monday, May 25.

But Queensland Teachers' Union president Kevin Bates said teachers would face a challenge preparing for those classes to return over the next four days, which is a "very short time frame".

"There are a range of logistical issues we still need to work through," he said.

Mr Bates said physical processes like school pick up and drop off needed to be worked through and redesigned.

 

"We're now in the COVID-world," he said.

The president said he believed the decision was balanced and that it did not come as a surprise.

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk announcing all Queensland students will return to school by May 25th. Photo Lachie Millard
Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk announcing all Queensland students will return to school by May 25th. Photo Lachie Millard

 

"What we're focused on now is what that will look like," he said.

"I guess that's one of the questions (whether parents will keep their kids at home regardless of the announcement), it's not clear to us what will happen," he said.

"In South Australia and Western Australia many parents have chosen to keep their kids at home.

"I'm not saying they should or shouldn't, I'm just saying that's a factor.

"It's simply how do teachers manage that?"

Mr Bates said the union would "be in the bunker" with the Education Department this week to work through the new arrangements.

Originally published as Union question if parents will want their kids in classrooms



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