THE Tyalgum Festival of Classical Music is almost upon us and some of the star acts have been announced. Didgeridoo player and winner of the 2012 ARIA for best classical album Kulkadunga, William Barton, has been announced as one of the show's star acts.
THE Tyalgum Festival of Classical Music is almost upon us and some of the star acts have been announced. Didgeridoo player and winner of the 2012 ARIA for best classical album Kulkadunga, William Barton, has been announced as one of the show's star acts. Douglas Kirkland

Tyalgum to undergo weekend musical transformation

TYALGUM is preparing to put on a show this weekend, as world-renowned musicians and local businesses turn the village into a creative hub.

Local and international musicians will perform at Tyalgum Festival of Classical Music from Friday September 6 to Sunday, September 8.

After receiving a much-needed boost from a Regional Arts NSW grant, the festival committee is hoping to draw in the crowds.

Last year, the festival attracted almost 1000 people into the village.

With ticket sales going well, project manager Jenny Unwin said she was hopeful to see similar numbers this year.

"We will have the winner and second place of the Lev Vlassenko Piano Competition performing," Ms Unwin said.

Ms Unwin said there would also be a dramatic piece on this year's festival theme: the history of the piano.

Last year, the festival attracted almost 1000 people in the village.  With ticket sales going well, project manager Jenny Unwin said she was hopeful to see similar numbers this year. 

The festival will be receiving a blessing from Indigenous elder Aunty Delmae Barton - whose son, William Barton, will be performing.

"People don't often associate classical music with Indigenous culture," Ms Unwin said.

"But the didgeridoo adds a completely different aspect to the performances."

"Classical music exists across all cultures."

William Barton is an internationally-renowned musician, having performed at the opening of the 2008 Olympics in Beijing.

Ms Unwin said this year's festival will see a number of international acts, while still supporting a range of local talent.

She said the Tweed Valley's local talent wouldn't exist without the encouragement of performers, the availability of venues and the appreciation of those behind the scenes.

"I'm very big on supporting the local in any instance," Ms Unwin said.

"I just finished with the Murwillumbah Festival of Performing Arts."

"There was such a high caliber of singers, dancers, musicians and dramatic performers."

"They're the seeds of future festivals - if we don't support them, we don't have a Tyalgum festival."

This year's Tyalgum Festival of Classical Music will see a special all-weekend version of the Tyalgum Village Markets.

Ms Unwin said the local businesses are getting on board to create a cultural hub across the weekend, with high hopes the federal election will not drastically impact the turnout.

"We'd encourage people who are out and about to come along - if you can, come and vote in Tyalgum."

"The whole village will be on show."



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