SURVIVOR: Troy Hill , who lost his leg and almost his life in a freak logging accident in 2013, has had a successful recovery thanks to a positive attitude.
SURVIVOR: Troy Hill , who lost his leg and almost his life in a freak logging accident in 2013, has had a successful recovery thanks to a positive attitude. Hamish Broome / The Northern Sta

Troy’s miraculous story of survival continues

URBENVILLE logging accident survivor Troy Hill has reached another milestone in his journey from comatose and near-death almost two years ago to alive and well today.

After the 33 year old father of three was critically injured by a falling tree just before Christmas 2013, he survived more than 20 emergency operations including a major amputation on his right leg alongside several life-threatening infections in major organs.

Now Troy is finally ready to leave the care of a team of Ballina nurses who have dressed his wounds daily for 18 months.

Over that time Troy has had three post-emergency operations, to reconstruct his internal organs, as he put it “rearranging things and putting things back together where they’re supposed to go”.

“As one doctor put it I’m a “Pandora’s box” - you never know what you’re going to get until you open it up and have a look,” he chuckled.

“I’ve had great surgeons, as bad as it is we sort of managed to piece it all back together.

“I laugh, it’s all you can do really.”

It’s that philosophical humour which has helped make Troy’s recovery so positive, according to senior nurse Sheree Viney, coordinator of community nursing services at Crowley Care in Ballina who has managed his daily care in conjunction with her team of nurses and Local Health District clinical nurse consultant Bill Tyrrell in Lismore.

“He has the right mental attitude,” Ms Viney said.

“He is just so easy going, well say he’s an inspiration to us.... he’s very accepting of his situation, he doesn’t get frustrated, and he’s remained positive throughout it all.

For his part Troy said there would be “nothing worse than lying in bed and whinging all day” - and although the black dog occasionally strikes, it doesn’t last.

“It’s always a fleeting moment, within five or 10 minutes, a couple of deep breaths you just go ‘let’s cruise, let’s do something different’.”

The next stage of Troy’s journey is to build his strength and ensure his body is as kept as mobile as possible to stay healthy.

With his new leg, he’s able to drive his treasured Mitsubishi Triton and go fishing with his three children, as well as stay pretty much self sufficient.

Over the next few months he’ll be getting into some physiotherapy work with his prosthetic leg and plenty of hours in the gym.

The end goal? “Just to start to live a normal as possible life,” he said.

Reflecting on the life-changing accident, Troy said this:

“You come to appreciate certain people a lot more, and it’s why I’ve become a lot more patient and flexible in the way I go about things,” he said.

“I try not to rush about and get consumed by all the little things.

“I’d like to say a massive thankyou to Sheree and all the nurses at Crowley - I couldn’t ask for better nurses.”



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