Daniel Haig is handing in his Sheriff's uniform to become a lawyer at Lismore Courthouse.
Daniel Haig is handing in his Sheriff's uniform to become a lawyer at Lismore Courthouse.

Trifecta: One man’s journey from cop, sheriff and now lawyer

Not many people get to get a taste of working in the justice system but for Daniel Haig, he's about to complete the trifecta.

The former South Australian Police Officer handed in his Sheriffs uniform on Friday after four years of working at Lismore Court House and now he's ready to embark on his new role as a criminal lawyer.

Having grown up in Kyogle, Mr Haig said while working as a police officer, he realised he'd rather be practising law so he enrolled in a law degree studying part time at the University of New England in 2014.

With a family quickly growing, Mr Haig said it was time to return to the Northern Rivers and he was very "fortunate" to land a job in the Sheriff's Office at the Lismore Courthouse in 2016.

 

Daniel Haig is handing in his Sheriff's uniform to become a lawyer at Lismore Courthouse.
Daniel Haig is handing in his Sheriff's uniform to become a lawyer at Lismore Courthouse.

 

"I kept studying law but working in the courthouse was ideal, I've met a lot of solicitors and got to know … the practical insight of how it works by observing hearings every day," Mr Haig said.

"I was able to do a work placement with (David) Helipern when he was a (sitting) magistrate.

"It certainly helped me see the theory I got taught at university and put it into in practice."

While he admits the full-time workload, part-time study and raising a family has its "challenges", Mr Haig said he's ready to take the next step in his legal career.

He'll be admitted as a NSW lawyer in Sydney this week, and will then begin practising at local law firm Bolt Findlay, while being mentored by solicitor Steve Bolt.

Mr Haig said it was a "mix of nerves" giving up his job as a Sheriff Officer, having been acting officer in charge since 2020, but he was looking forward coming back to the courthouse as a lawyer.

He encouraged anyone studying law to find a way to put what they're learning into practice.

"If those who can find a job within the justice system, it can give you a good insight into how it works, and how the theory comes into practice," Mr Haig said.



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