Are these nine road rage triggers really that ‘trivial’?
Are these nine road rage triggers really that ‘trivial’? Patrick Woods

Top things that make us road-rage

A NEW NRMA campaign RoadWave suggests encourages motorists to be calm and considerate on the road, claiming most road rage incidents are triggered by trivial incidents and misunderstandings.

However, according to feedback from the NRMA’s 2012 Courtesy Driver campaign, taligaiting is the number one road rage inducer.

1. Tailgaters

Tailgaters have been branded as the biggest aggravators on our roads according to the NRMA’s inaugural Courtesy Driver campaign. The survey found that NSW and ACT motorists (42%) believe tailgating is the biggest pet peeve on the roads. The survey also found 69 per cent have been tailgated.

Tailgating is number one road rage trigger according to an NRMA survey.
Tailgating is number one road rage trigger according to an NRMA survey.

2. A driver intentionally cutting in front of you

NRMA’s Courtesy Driver campaign survey found more than half (51%) of the respondents had another driver intentionally cut in front of them.

3. Drivers who don’t give a ‘thank you’ wave

How about  a wave, mate?
How about a wave, mate?

4. Drivers who drive at snail’s pace and then speed up at overtaking opportunities

5. People slamming brakes unnecessarily

6. Merging onto freeways/motorways without indicating

7. Driving at erratic speed “stopping, starting and slowing down all in a few seconds.

8. Not letting a driver into your lane

9. Distracted drivers “texting and driving”.

Think of your health before you rage

THE long-term health impacts of road rage have been revealed in a world-first study commissioned by Queensland’s peak motoring body.

The landmark research conducted by the University of the Sunshine Coast shows courteous drivers can live longer than aggressive or stressed drivers.

And relaxed drivers can help others live longer too.

RACQ executive general manager for advocacy Paul Turner said the year-long study showed direct links between driver behaviour and stress levels, with implications for long-term health.

“Our study subjects were placed in different driving scenarios while sharing the road with certain stereotypes of drivers - aggressive, distracted, oblivious or kind and considerate - while their heart rates, anxiety levels, and blood pressure were monitored,” he said.



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