Noel Graham looking at Murwillumbah's town clock, which resets itself automatically for daylight saving.
Noel Graham looking at Murwillumbah's town clock, which resets itself automatically for daylight saving. Photo illustration: John Gass

Time to wind back the clocks

DAYLIGHT saving ends this weekend for another year.

Outspoken critic of daylight saving Tweed MP Geoff Provest said many people across the region would be glad to see the back of it.

"I have always stood by that it has a social and economic impact for people on the Tweed," Mr Provest said.

Mr Provest said the one in three Tweed people who cross the border for work every day would be glad that daylight saving was finishing for the year.

Residents are urged to wind their clocks back one hour on Sunday from 3am.

Daylight saving will resume on October 7 at 2am.

Meanwhile, while residents can simply wind back their clocks at home, Tweed Shire Council faces a bigger task.

A council spokesman said changing the clocks back an hour on public buildings would be a "top priority" for staff on Monday morning.

There is at least one clock that is a little more advanced.

The clock hanging over the corner of Murwillumbah Rd and Queen St, in Murwillumbah, will not require winding back as it automatically resets itself each year.

It was restored by the Rotary Club of Murwillumbah Central and donated to the council.



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