Truth behind roadside devices not so sinister

The roadside devices that were located on the New England Highway at Mt Kynoch.
The roadside devices that were located on the New England Highway at Mt Kynoch.

THEY sent social media into a spin and had motorists hitting the brake pedal, but today we can reveal the far-less-sinister truth.

Roadside devices attached to a speed limit sign on the New England Hwy at Mt Kynoch last week were not speed cameras, according to the Department of Transport and Main Roads.

"The cameras (shown in a photograph on social media) are used for traffic surveys and were set up to collect data on the number and type of vehicles passing through the area," a department representative told The Chronicle.

Many on Facebook and Twitter claimed the "hidden" devices, which were in place for 24 hours from June 23, were a new, high-tech speed camera deployed by police.

WHAT'S HOT ONLINE

JUMPING TO CONCLUSIONS

What social media users had to say about the roadside devices:

  • Speed camera or tracking system, why do the police have to track innocent people?
  •  They are number plate recognition cameras ? I thought we all knew that already ?
  •   Even if they were speed cameras, if you do the speed limit you have nothing to worry about!!!
  •   So do those cameras get you for doing over 80?
  •  I was driving home to Ipswich. I did see a flash from a sign. I was slowing down so they haven't turned them off.
  •  They're speed cameras and they should be on every speed limit sign.
  •  On high traffic roads conventional rubber strips can't be used as traffic counters. Cameras are used instead.


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