Coast invention aims to save lives

The Big Red Button that can help you save a life

WHEN hearing how a family day care staff member pulled an immersed child from the backyard pool in Western Australia and ran next door for help instead of administering the CPR she was trained to do, a light went on in Stefan Ossenberg's head.

The Palmwoods entrepreneur, who has an extensive background in everything to do with pools, said it "struck me as odd" that the woman, who had completed CPR training six months before the incident, did not act on the situation but instead reacted by seeking help elsewhere.

"Less than 5% of Australians know how to do CPR and I learned that even those who do can panic and forget their training when faced with a real-life scenario," he said.

"In most cases of an emergency it has shown through studies people panic and forget the obvious like ringing 000."

Through his business R&R Solutions, Mr Ossenberg has developed the Resus-a-Station and hopes that, with the support of the community for his Kick Starter drive, it will save lives.

The simple device is powered by three AAA batteries and features three buttons, each dedicated to the correct CPR instructions for infants, children and adults.

Stefan Ossenberg has designed product called Resus-a-Station which can guide people through the CPR process at the press of a button.
Stefan Ossenberg has designed product called Resus-a-Station which can guide people through the CPR process at the press of a button. Che Chapman

The Resus-a-Station is designed to be wall mounted anywhere around the home or business for easy access to voice commands on how to administer CPR to assist not only in drownings and immersions, but for heart attack, respiratory illness, trauma, Sids and cardiac disease.

"You just punch the button and it starts talking you through the process step by step," Mr Ossenberg said.

"Each button gives you five minutes of talk time, including a prompt for you to alert emergency services, and the final stage is the rhythm used for the CPR compression, 30 compressions then breathe breathe hopefully by then help would have arrived."

Mr Ossenberg said although there were already phone apps available and compulsory CPR charts required for every pool, having a device that could provide verbal cues might boost people's confidence in stepping forward to act in an emergency.

"The Resus-a-Station will never replace formal CPR training, but has been designed to assist you in that moment of need," he said.

"The Resus-a-Station is there to help snap you out of that moment of panic and guide you.

"At the end of the day, if it saves one life I've done my job."

Mr Ossenberg launched a crowd funding appeal and hopes to raise $35,000 to cover the costs of tooling, manufacturing and shipping for the first order of Resus-a-Stations.

If he reaches his target before the campaign closes on Saturday, May 21, the $29.99 device will be available for purchase in three months time.

To help make the Resus-a-Station a reality, visit http://tinyurl.com/zu442nc.



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