A young lad takes a bull into the bar of the Commercial Hotel during the inaugural Beef Week in 1982.
A young lad takes a bull into the bar of the Commercial Hotel during the inaugural Beef Week in 1982.

Casino's Beef Week is turning 30

THE year was 1982 and the world watched as Argentina and Britain went to war over the Falkland Islands, the term personal computer took hold with the release of the Commodore 64, and Charles and Diana welcomed their first child, William.

And in Casino, the first Beef Week Festival was held.

Three decades later and the organising committee of what has become Casino's signature event has decided 1982 will be theme of this year's 30th anniversary festival.

"With this year being Beef Week's 30th birthday, we thought it would be good to go back to when it all began," Beef Week president Stuart George said.

"So we've adopted 1982 - When It All Began as the theme. People can choose anything they like about 1982 - the fashions, the music, events that happened, anything that relates to 1982."

While planning for the 30th birthday festival is still under way, Mr George said promotions consultant Michael Zann, who had been instrumental in the development of Beef Week, and the man who was Casino's mayor in 1982, Gerard Kelly would be invited to attend this year's Beef Week.

All former Beef Week queens and past presidents of the organising committee will be asked to join the celebrations.

Beef Week will run from May 19-29.

The major sponsor of the festival this year is the Casino-based company Forest Enterprises Development and Consultancy.



Unmentionable theatre play about hard life choices

premium_icon Unmentionable theatre play about hard life choices

Cock is a play about a man and a woman competing for the same lover

There's a house for everyone, no matter your budget

premium_icon There's a house for everyone, no matter your budget

Lismore houses offer a home for all budgets

Up to 'eight' potential buyers eye off Kimberley Kampers

premium_icon Up to 'eight' potential buyers eye off Kimberley Kampers

Former employees are owed more than $1 million

Local Partners