Menu
News

Swimming with whales experience to continue in Hervey Bay

GREEN LIGHT: Tourists and locals will be able to keep swimming with whales, after it was approved by the government.
GREEN LIGHT: Tourists and locals will be able to keep swimming with whales, after it was approved by the government. Fraser Coast Tourism and Events

AN OPPORTUNITY to swim in the ocean with whales is just one of the many reasons why people come to Hervey Bay to whale-watch.

Despite a number of tourism operators already offering the swimming with whales experience, up until now the intimate experience was running on a trial-basis.

The government had concerns that the activity was dangerous.

But Minister for National Parks Minister Steven Miles said the activity has now been approved and could continue running.

"While it's an activity with some risks, no incidents occurred during the trial," Mr Miles said.

"Swimming with whales is proving a very popular product, in the range of Hervey Bay's many attractions, and I'm delighted to know it can continue."

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk, who touched-down in Hervey Bay on Sunday, said she would like to see our town become a world whale reserve.

"That is something my Government is prepared to have a much closer look at," Ms Palaszczuk said.

"Whale watching has become a growth industry, we have some 30,000 whales that come into Hervey Bay, and that number continues to increase."

Of the 11 boats currently operating in the Fraser Coast whale watching fleet, six are licenced to offer the "swimming with whales" experience.

The industry's strict code of practice ensures the giant mammals' welfare and conservation are paramount, and any encounters must be solely on the whales' terms.

In Queensland, boats or swimmers can approach within a 100 metre radius of a whale or dolphin... however curious whales may approach swimmers and often do.

In the swimming with the whales experience, participants are in the water holding on to a boom net, duckboard or a mermaid line. Mr Miles warns this is a regulated and professionally run activity, with penalties in place for those who do the wrong thing.

"Don't attempt swimming with these giants of the deep on your own," he said.

"You risk injury, and a $630.75 on-the-spot fine or maximum $15,138 penalty for approaching whales too closely."

Topics:  fctourism fcwhales fraser coast



Floods cause decrease in sales and land value in Lismore

STILL VERY VALUABLE: Land values in Lismore held their own or increased despite the flood last March.

There is a growing desire to live in smaller villages close to town

Vanpackers are forced to pay fines: Council

Byron Shire Council is concerned about the spike in illegal camping at Scarabolittis Lookout at St Helena.

There is no getting out of paying fines for illegal camping.

Bitcoin and crypto currency craze taking off in Nimbin

The cryptocurrency, which allows anonymous transactions unrestricted by global borders, is popular with tech heads, people suspicious of government and those seeking to launder money.

Enter into the crypto currency world in Nimbin

Local Partners