Lucy McDonald.
Lucy McDonald.

Son seeks answers on missing mum

LAST Friday was the eighth anniversary of Lucy McDonald’s disappearance from her Lismore Heights home.

For her only son, Colin, now 31 and living in Sydney, it has been a horrendous journey that has left him and his younger sister, Violet, desperate to find answers.

Mrs McDonald went missing from her home without a trace in April 2002, leaving police baffled.

It was the second blow to the family after Mrs McDonald’s cousin, Lois Roberts, was found murdered in 1999.

“I need to put mum to rest. I need to know where she is and what happened to her so my family and I can get some closure,” Mr McDonald said yesterday. “I feel like it’s time to give this another go.”

Mr McDonald was 24 and studying dance at the Conservatorium in Lismore when his mother went missing.

“From the outset I knew in my heart she wasn’t alive, and my sister felt the same,” he said.

After nine months of futile leads, he left Lismore to start a new life in Sydney.

“I decided to turn a negative into a positive and follow my dream of dancing,” he said.

“I pretty much left it alone for five years, but eventually it caught up with me.

“That’s when I found the support group, Friends and Family of Missing Persons, which was started by the Victims of Crime group, and through them I’ve learnt to let the process take its course.”

After the 2008 Coronial Inquest in Sydney returned an open finding, Mr McDonald was emotionally exhausted and retreated into his work.

“I should’ve chased it up then, but I didn’t have it in me,” he said.

“I needed to regroup – that’s a part of the process.”

Mr McDonald, who comes from a big local family, said his mother was very well known in the area.

“I find it hard to believe that someone like her can just disappear without someone knowing something,” he said.

“So many things don’t add up. She never left home without family or friends and never without her keys and wallet.

“I believe she left the house with someone she knew and trusted and I just hope someone might come forward.”

After reading three briefs of evidence and all the interviews, Mr McDonald believes the case should be reopened and reinvestigated.

“I thought, ‘who are these people’? They didn’t know my mum. Why didn’t they talk to my side of the family?”

After eight years of trying to move on, Mr McDonald has accepted it’s not that simple.

“It can return with something as simple as a song or a smell,” he said.

“I need to put mum to rest. I need to know where she is and what happened to her so my family and I can get some closure”



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