Sugary drinks will be banned from cafeterias and vending machines in health facilities across the region.
Sugary drinks will be banned from cafeterias and vending machines in health facilities across the region.

Soft drinks banned at health facilities

THE sale of sugary drinks at health facilities across the Northern Rivers will be phased out by the end of the year.

Staff and visitors will soon start to notice changes ahead of the complete ban by December 1.

Soft drinks will not be available to buy from cafeterias or vending machines at any facility within the Northern NSW Local Health District.

Lismore Community Health diabetes dietitian, Emma Alley, said reducing sugar by making better drink choices was a "great first step to help you maintain a healthy weight, and keep your teeth healthy".

"When people make better choices about what they put into their bodies, their health improves in so many areas. It really can be as easy as choosing water over soft drink," she said.

Lismore Base Hospital Fresh Plus Manager Kristal Wilson, Northern NSW Local Health District Diabetes dietitian Emma Alley, and Chief Executive Wayne Jones, enjoy a healthy lunch ahead of upcoming menu changes in Northern NSW health facilities.
Lismore Base Hospital Fresh Plus Manager Kristal Wilson, Northern NSW Local Health District Diabetes dietitian Emma Alley, and Chief Executive Wayne Jones, enjoy a healthy lunch ahead of upcoming menu changes in Northern NSW health facilities.

Under the new policy, healthy choices will make up at least 75 percent of the food and drink offerings in NSW Health facilities.

Health district chief executive, Wayne Jones, said it was all part of the goal of making healthy the new normal.

"As a health provider, our local health district has a responsibility to set a good example by making healthier choices easy," he said.

"We're doing this by increasing the offerings of nutritious foods and drinks available for purchase on site and reducing the availability of less healthy options."

According to the Public Health Association of Australia tooth decay is the most common health condition in Australia and with more than half of all adults and nearly one quarter of children overweight or obese, no single action will be able to tackle these issues.



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