Scott D'Amico (left) and Brad Harker celebrate after the same sex marriage vote result announcement in Queens Park, Brisbane Australia, November 15, 2017. Australians have given same-sex marriage their approval with a 61.6 per cent 'yes' vote in a voluntary survey. (AAP Image/David Clark) NO ARCHIVING
Scott D'Amico (left) and Brad Harker celebrate after the same sex marriage vote result announcement in Queens Park, Brisbane Australia, November 15, 2017. Australians have given same-sex marriage their approval with a 61.6 per cent 'yes' vote in a voluntary survey. (AAP Image/David Clark) NO ARCHIVING DAVID CLARK

Sky didn't fall in after same sex marriage vote: Opinion

WE ALL woke up last Sunday week to see the sun had risen and the birds were singing in the trees, just as they do most mornings.

The fact that same-sex marriage (SSM) became legal the previous day seems to have had no effect, just as I have predicted in this column many times.

My repeated call to those who were against SSM to give me an example of how their lives would be adversely affected by offering marriage equality to all Australians regardless of sexual preference went unanswered. Now, I'm quite prepared to acknowledge that maybe ultra-conservatives no longer read this column because they find my opinions distasteful; you can't please all of the people all of the time. But I'd like to think that perhaps some who did read my words may have paused and reflected on their attitude and, just maybe, decided that they couldn't really think of a concrete reason to continue to discriminate against a section of the community who are attracted to members of the same sex.

Last year I conducted a mini-poll among friends to see what the general consensus was regarding same-sex marriage. Most said it's long overdue. Now, in the interests of full disclosure: While I am heterosexual, I have quite a few gay and lesbian mates, most of whom have been in apparently stable and loving relationships for a good many years. Some have children, the vast majority of whom are pretty normal and don't seem to have been scarred too badly by having two mothers or two dads. There are a few exceptions, as one would expect, but no real indication that the sexual preferences of their parents had anything to do with their angst.

The (very) few friends who were against SSM had only one reason; they couldn't bear to think of what I affectionately call the Alphabets (because every time I look another letter has been added to the LGBTQI category) do in bed. When I asked if they routinely think of what others do in bed they shouted no, of course not. When I pointed out that not being married really didn't stop people of any preference from having sex, they had no answer.

Something I've been awaiting for two years, the divorce of Nick and Sarah Jensen, will not come to pass. Somewhat predictably, the eminently Christian ACT couple who, in 2015, vowed to end their marriage of 12 years should SSM become legal in Australia, have backpedalled at the speed of light. Meanwhile, in Perth, a lesbian couple who married using a legal loophole the same year have become the first Australian Alphabet couple to file for divorce.

Life goes on, as it should.

A merry Christmas to all.



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