BACK ON DECK: Judith Glanville with her husband Phil of Casino. Judith had a stroke in April and wants to make people aware you can still live life to the full.
BACK ON DECK: Judith Glanville with her husband Phil of Casino. Judith had a stroke in April and wants to make people aware you can still live life to the full. Doug Eaton

"Lucky" Judith fights back after suffering stroke

STROKE survivor Judith Glanville, 74, doesn't remember much about the time in April when she fell in the shower.

"About the only thing I remember is my husband and daughter coming into Lismore Base and talking to me and my daughter saying 'give Dad the finger'," Ms Glanville said with a laugh.

But she can fully recall the challenge of regaining her health and mobility in the aftermath of the life-threatening intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) caused by bleeding in her brain.

"I couldn't talk and I couldn't walk - I was in Lismore Base for a week and in rehab in Ballina for six weeks," she said.

"It was a good month before I could walk properly."

Despite an uphill climb to regain her health, which included physical rehabilitation and speech therapy, she said she never became frustrated and counts herself as lucky. More than 65% of those who survive a stroke are left with a permanent disability which impedes everyday activities.

"I had confidence that I would get better and my husband was there every day helping me.

"It wasn't easy at all, but I always had a positive attitude."

"Everyone was helping me and I just kind of came good."

This week is National Stroke Week, launched by the National Stroke Foundation to raise awareness of stroke and stroke prevention.

More than 4000 Unite to Stop Stroke activities are also expected to be held across the country, including morning teas, fun runs, health checks, workplace displays and community information sessions.

The National Stroke Foundation dream team that includes professional athletes and stroke victims will run a relay equivalent to a lap of Australia.

National Stroke Foundation CEO Dr Erin Lalor said the thousands of participants involved were helping lower their risk of stroke and raising awareness.

"The best prevention for stroke is to simply stay healthy; eat well, exercise and have regular check-ups at the doctor," she said.

At a glance

  • Stroke is Australia's second-biggest killer
  • One in six Australians will suffer a stroke in their lifetime
  • Of those who do survive stroke, 65% are left with a disability that impedes their ability to carry out daily living activities.

SOURCE: National Stroke Foundation



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