Graeme and Anne Lockyer, of Anchorage Holiday Park Iluka, have submitted a DA to council.
Graeme and Anne Lockyer, of Anchorage Holiday Park Iluka, have submitted a DA to council. Graham Orams

Sewerage scheme to boost tourism

AS WORK on the Iluka Sewerage Scheme continues, the town is making plans to forge ahead. Graeme and Anne Lockyer, owners of Anchorage Holiday Park Iluka, have no doubt the new sewerage system will enable Iluka to expand its tourism potential.

The Lockyers have submitted a development application (DA) to Clarence Valley Council seeking to expand its total number of sites.

If approved, the move would stop Anchorage Holiday Park from having to turn away visitors to the Valley during peak periods.

"It (the sewerage) will make a world of difference because without sewerage we can't develop," Mr Lockyer said.

"Although unseen, the income of the town really exists on tourism - fishing doesn't contribute the way it used to and probably never will again."

Mr Lockyer said four-and-a-half acres of the park's 10 acres was currently undeveloped.

"It (the DA) increases the total site numbers, which includes residents and cabins, from 116 to 145," he said.

"The increase is ... mainly in sites - including some with their own ensuite facilities.

"In addition, there will be approximately five or six fairly large, upmarket, cabin-type accommodation."

Mr Lockyer said he currently had to turn holidaymakers away during the holiday season.

"We just can't accommodate the people at Christmas time," he said.

"For instance, at the moment we've got a waiting list of about 15 or 20 people and the likelihood is we won't be able to accommodate them.

"It's the same throughout the town (Iluka); all the holiday accommodation is booked for the busy week from Boxing Day for about two or three weeks after that."

A Clarence Valley Council spokesman said work on the Iluka Sewerage Scheme was right on track.

He said construction on the sewerage treatment plant on Johnsons Ln would be finished in December, with testing to take place early in the new year.

The spokesman said each property would have a modern pressure system connected to it instead of relying on the old gravity-fed system.

It is expected the scheme will be fully operational by the end of next year.



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