Scottie’s thoughts with his mates on D-Day

HENRY ’SCOTTIE’ WILSON.
HENRY ’SCOTTIE’ WILSON.

JUNE 6 this year marked the 70th anniversary since the D-Day landings during the Second World War.

For Ballina's Henry "Scottie" Wilson, it's a day he doesn't particularly like to think about.

He was in the British army as a paratrooper at the time and took part in the operation.

The 90-year-old's thoughts on the anniversary of this decisive event were with all those men who didn't come home.

He said his role in the operation, like other soldiers, was just "doing my bit - and it was just a small bit".

"I would like to forget it," he said.

The landings at Normandy in 1944 were the largest seaborne invasion in history. The operation began the invasion of German-occupied western Europe, led to the restoration of the French Republic and contributed to an Allied victory in the war.

The airborne assault involved 24,000 British, US, and Canadian troops who were dropped just after midnight on June 6, 1944.

The first seaborne troops began landing at 6.30am.

Allied casualties for the operation are reported to have been at least 12,000, with 4414 confirmed dead.



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