Make blue-tongue lizards welcome in your backyard.
Make blue-tongue lizards welcome in your backyard. Contributed

Scaly friends need our help

WITH young blue-tongue lizards at their most vulnerable, now is the time to be a backyard buddy.

Blue-tongue babies are now old enough to be out and about, foraging for themselves, but it is the riskiest time in a blue-tongue lizard's life.

They have not yet developed plates under their scales, making them easy prey.

Foundation for National Parks and Wildlife chief executive Steve Corbett said centralian blue-tongues, shinglebacks and eastern blue-tongues lived in Queensland.

"Eastern blue-tongues can have up to 25 young at a time, but most won't survive to adulthood because of predation," he said. "By making gardens a safer places for blue-tongues, we can help increase their populations in the wild."

Although they can look tough, Mr Corbett said blue-tongue lizards were good at bluffing.

"They aren't dangerous but when threatened they will flatten themselves out to look big, will open their bright pink mouth to show their vibrant blue tongue and will hiss loudly."



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