Rodman lashes looters: ‘We’re not f**king animals’

 

 

NBA great Dennis Rodman called for an end to looting in response to the death of George Floyd, telling his social media followers Sunday that "we're human beings, not f**king animals."

The New York Post reports that businesses all over America were ravaged during the weekend as protests continued to escalate after Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, was killed in Minneapolis last week by a white police officer.

"I think someone needs to come out and say, 'Hey, guys, why are we looting? Why are we stealing? Why are we creating more issues, more problems?" the 59-year-old Rodman said in an Instagram video, titled "Rest in Power George Floyd."

 

 

"This is a bad, bad situation. But the fact that you're gonna protest, protest in the right way. You don't have to go and burn down things, steal things, burn things and stuff like that."

Officer Derek Chauvin, 44, was charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter after he pressed his knee into Floyd's neck during an arrest.

Floyd, who died soon after, had been suspected of spending a counterfeit $20 note.

Rodman, who sympathised with the peaceful protests taking place, added that resorting to violence was not the solution and "we have enough issues with" coronavirus.

 

 

 

 

Rodman was among many athletes and celebrities - including his former Bulls teammate Michael Jordan - to speak out about the Floyd protests.

Rodman is also a friend of US President Donald Trump, who was forced to hide in a bunker on Friday as protests circled the White House.

"Please understand … we have to live together," Rodman said. "We're human beings, we're not f**king animals."

 

 

A man smashes the front window of the Realm of the Goddess jewellery store on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles. Picture: AP Photo/Chris Pizzello
A man smashes the front window of the Realm of the Goddess jewellery store on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles. Picture: AP Photo/Chris Pizzello

 

People take jewellery from the Realm of the Goddess store as looting occurs across the US during protests over the death of George Floyd. Picture: AP Photo/Chris Pizzello
People take jewellery from the Realm of the Goddess store as looting occurs across the US during protests over the death of George Floyd. Picture: AP Photo/Chris Pizzello

 

RIOTING AND LOOTING

But violent protest, vandalism, arson and widespread looting continues to rock the US.

In some cities, thieves smashed their way into department stores and retail chain stores and ran off with as much merchandise as they could carry.

The looting is leaving shop owners, many of them smaller business owners who are just beginning to reopen their businesses after the coronavirus shutdowns, to clean up their shattered stores.

 

San Francisco police officers arrested at least 80 people Sunday night on violating a curfew and looting charges.

 

A woman jumps out of a Walgreens store empty-handed in Chicago, after seeing police officers nearby. Picture: John J. Kim/Chicago Tribune via AP
A woman jumps out of a Walgreens store empty-handed in Chicago, after seeing police officers nearby. Picture: John J. Kim/Chicago Tribune via AP

Fifteen people were arrested after a second night of violence erupted Sunday night in Madison, Wisconsin, with police firing tear gas as protesters threw rocks and damaged store downtown stores following an afternoon peaceful protest.

 

Protesters exit a 7-Eleven store in Chicago during protests over the death of George Floyd. Picture: John J. Kim/Chicago Tribune via AP
Protesters exit a 7-Eleven store in Chicago during protests over the death of George Floyd. Picture: John J. Kim/Chicago Tribune via AP

 

Police reported that multiple stores were looted in the business corridor that connects the state Capitol to the University of Wisconsin campus.

 

A person exits a broken window of a Starbucks, in Chicago, carrying items after a march and rally over the death of George Floyd. Picture: John J. Kim/Chicago Tribune via AP
A person exits a broken window of a Starbucks, in Chicago, carrying items after a march and rally over the death of George Floyd. Picture: John J. Kim/Chicago Tribune via AP

 

Looting was rampant in downtown Washington and elsewhere in the city as protests turned violent for a third night.

Protesters broke into a branch of Capital Bank, and empty jewellery boxes could be seen scattered on the sidewalk outside a Mervis Diamonds store.

 

A Philadelphia police officer detains a person inside a damaged pharmacy during the Justice for George Floyd Philadelphia Protest. Picture: AP Photo/Matt Slocum
A Philadelphia police officer detains a person inside a damaged pharmacy during the Justice for George Floyd Philadelphia Protest. Picture: AP Photo/Matt Slocum

 

After protesters started looting a La Colombe coffee shop, someone in the crowd yelled, "What are you looting a coffee shop for? You're messing up the whole message."

Washington State's Gov. Jay Inslee activated 200 more National Guard troops to respond to looting and vandalism in Bellevue, east of Seattle where 400 members of the guard had been deployed to help contain protests.

 

 

 

PEACEFUL PROTESTS

While many of the demonstrations around the country have descended into violence, despite curfews in big cities across the U.S. and the deployment of thousands of National Guard soldiers over the past week, many other demonstrations have been peaceful.

 

A rally and march by People's Organization Progress is held to protest the death of George Floyd, in Newark, New Jersey. Picture: Michael Mancuso/NJ Advance Media via AP
A rally and march by People's Organization Progress is held to protest the death of George Floyd, in Newark, New Jersey. Picture: Michael Mancuso/NJ Advance Media via AP

In several capital and smaller cities, protests have been both peaceful and characterised by racially diverse crowds.

 

In other places, police tried to calm tensions by kneeling in solidarity with demonstrators.

 

San Francisco Police Chief Bill Scott said demonstrations that drew about 1000 people carrying signs and chanting "George Floyd" and "Black lives matter" were overwhelmingly peaceful on Sunday.

The vast majority of demonstrators dispersed without incident before the 8pm curfew.

A rally and march by the People's Organization Progress is held to protest the death of George Floyd in Newark, New Jersey. Picture: AP
A rally and march by the People's Organization Progress is held to protest the death of George Floyd in Newark, New Jersey. Picture: AP

George Floyd, the man whose murder sparked these riots, was a "peaceful motivator" who would have rejected the violence and destruction that has accompanied some demonstrations across the US, his brother Terence Floyd said on Monday.

 

 

"He was about unity," Terence told Good Morning America on Monday.

"The things that are transpiring now, they may call it unity, but it's destructive unity. It's not what he was about. It's not what my brother was about."

 

 

TRUMP SLAMS GOVERNORS AS 'WEAK'

It comes as US President Donald Trump on Monday derided the nation's governors as "weak" and demanded tougher crackdowns on protesters in the aftermath of another night of violent protests in dozens of American cities.

 

Mr Trump spoke to governors on a video teleconference with law enforcement and national security officials, telling the local leaders they "have to get much tougher" amid nationwide protests and criticising their responses.

"Most of you are weak," Mr Trump said. "You have to arrest people."

The days of protests were triggered by the death of George Floyd, a black man who died after he was pinned at the neck by a white Minneapolis police officer. They turned violent in several cities, with looting and mayhem, and fires ignited in the historic park across from the White House.

Attorney-General Bill Barr, who was also on the Monday call, told governors they have to "dominate" the streets and control, not react to crowds, and urged them to "go after troublemakers."

 

Originally published as Rodman lashes looters: 'We're not f**king animals'



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