CLASS: Rod Murray, music teacher from Richmond River High School rocking out during the school’s River Idol concert.
CLASS: Rod Murray, music teacher from Richmond River High School rocking out during the school’s River Idol concert. Patrick Gorbunovs

Crowd roars its approval at River Idol

MICROPHONES, guitars, ukuleles, an audience and four judges: It's River Idol.

Richmond River High School's take on a talent quest brought out the entertainment and the skills of students and staff alike in the end of year activity yesterday afternoon.

With a lot of talent throughout the school, this talent quest was a great way for the students to show off their skills to the other students and share in a bit of enjoyment with the school, music teacher and the brain behind the event, Ben Wordsworth said.

River Idol was something that happened regularly quite a few years ago at the school and after he heard about it, he instantly wanted to revive it, he explained.

Both students and staff were taking to the stage to entertain the crowd with their musical, dramatic or dancing talents.

"It's good to see the teachers making fools of themselves," Mr Wordsworth laughed.

Tara Coles, aged 14 of Richmond River High School rocking out during the school's
Tara Coles, aged 14 of Richmond River High School rocking out during the school's "River Idol" concert. Patrick Gorbunovs

With 22 different acts in the afternoon event, Year 10 students Amy Feain and Ruby Mueller, both 16, were hosting the show.

Student Jamali Bowden, 15, said he had a great time performing onstage when he got up and performed the song From Little Things Big Things Grow on the ukulele.

Later on Teshan Joy, 14, Kaitlin Harris, 15, and Tara Coles, 14, performed a beautiful version of Riptide for the crowd, before Ella Veit-Prince, 14, performed a song called Stupid which brought down the house and earned 10s from all four judges.

While at the end of the day a King or Queen of River Idol would be crowned, the main focus of the event was fun - for the students, the staff, and the school on the whole, Mr Wordsworth said.

He thanked the head of the CAPA division at the school, Peter Howes, for the successful afternoon.

Mr Wordsworth explained that creative and performing arts education was very important to him and even more important for the students.

In fact, he's recently started a new project within the school - a percussion group of 15 drummers who perform at local primary schools - a scheme he hopes can grow into the future.



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