East Lismore resident Ron Gaudron holds a feather from George, all he has left of the 34-year-old sulphur-crested cockatoo stolen from the family home on Sunday.
East Lismore resident Ron Gaudron holds a feather from George, all he has left of the 34-year-old sulphur-crested cockatoo stolen from the family home on Sunday. Jacklyn Wagner

‘Return George’ plea to petnappers

HARDCORE animal liberationists have delivered the cruellest blow to an East Lismore family by ‘liberating’ its beloved pet of 34 years.

Ron Gaudron woke on Sunday morning to find one of his family’s oldest members, a sulphur-crested cockatoo named George, gone – cage and all.

All that remained was a self-righteous note cursing the Gaudrons’ karma and accusing them of imprisoning George. It stated George would be ‘rehabilitated’ and returned to the wild.

A distressed Mr Gaudron welled up as he explained the loss and pleaded with the birdnappers to return one of his oldest mates.

“It’s just devastating to the whole family. I’ve had George since I left the navy in 1975. That’s why he swears like a sailor,” he said with a teary grin.

“I just want him back, no questions. I won’t do anything. Just bring him back, please.

“If anyone tried to set him free it would kill him, it would be a death sentence. There’s no way he would survive in the wild. He was born in captivity, raised in captivity. For God’s sake, he’s been with us for 34 years. He must be so distressed not knowing what’s going on. He’d be pining for us. I can’t believe these people can be so cruel.”

Much like his adopted dad, a tough old biker and president of the local branch of the Ulysses Club, George is a bit of a softy at heart.

“He’d pretend to be tough. He’d goad strangers saying, ‘You want to have a go?’, but really he’s scared of green tree frogs. He’d freak out whenever they came up on the veranda,” Mr Gaudron said.

“But when he’d hear my bike coming down the road he’d get excited and let everyone know I was home.”

Mr Gaudron, who organises the Ulysses Club’s annual toy run, a Christmas fundraiser for local kids due to kick off next week, said cockatoos could live to 80 years of age, and he had planned to leave George with his youngest son when he died.

“These idiots don’t know what they’ve done, they don’t understand what this bird means to us. He grew up with us. He is one of the family,” he said. “I don’t know how I’m going to tell my mother. She got very attached to George, babysitting him while I was away working on the railways.

“They say they haven’t stolen him, but they have. He’s not their property, he’s not my property. He’s just one of the family.”



Wind blows fires close to buildings

Wind blows fires close to buildings

"Wind started to pick up and brought it close in and around a few sheds”

He works 18 hours a day, but earned only $700 last month

premium_icon He works 18 hours a day, but earned only $700 last month

He works a crazy 14 to 18 hours a day

Terrifying break-ins have residents on edge

premium_icon Terrifying break-ins have residents on edge

"He left female underwear behind and also left blood in our sink"

Local Partners