Members of the Suffolk Park Progress Association opposed to a 52-unit medium-density residential development gather on the proposed development site at Suffolk Park.
Members of the Suffolk Park Progress Association opposed to a 52-unit medium-density residential development gather on the proposed development site at Suffolk Park.

Residents fight DA for 52 units

THE Suffolk Park Progress Association will fight a developmentapplication for a medium-density residential development at Suffolk Park which it fears would have a huge impact on the community.

The development application from Reef Break Solutions is for 52 units in 13 residential flat buildings each containing four two-bedroom units on a 3.3 hectare site in Broken Head Road, adjacent to the Suffolk Park Service Station.

The application, which has been recommended for approval byByron Shire Council staff, subject to conditions, will go before council at its meeting today.

An on-site inspection was held on Tuesday involving members of the progress association and the council.

Progress association spokesperson Bernie Petry said the development had been in abeyance for more than two years, with several objections from the community raised at a meeting in December 2007 in terms of floodplain management, traffic issues and wildlife protection.

He said that while the association was not against development on the site, it was the size and scale that raised concerns.

“Only about 30 per cent of the site is suitable for development, and with 52 units proposed, well, it’s not what I would call medium density,” Mr Petry said.

“The development will have an impact on the floodprone land from drainage, as the land currently acts as reservoir for stormwater from Byron Hills.

“It will also impact on Tallow Creek, especially downstream, and the proximity of the development to the Suffolk Park roundabout would mean huge traffic congestion problems.”

Suffolk Park resident Helen Brown said the site was floodprone and was unsuitable for development.

The association is also opposed to the visual impact of the proposed development.

“The number of dwellings needs to be reduced by one-third and the spacing between the blocks of units should be increased,” Mr Petry said.

“People are going to be living on top of each other.”

Mr Petry said there were also soil contamination issues and the association wanted to know how the council was going to deal with it.

The report to be presented to council today says that 36 submissions have been received in relation to the DA, with 33 opposed and three in support.



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