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Casino Aboriginal art appreciated

Aboriginal artist Jai Walker, of Casino, hard at work at the Jambama Arts Centre in Casino creating paintings for display at the Platypus Gallery.
Aboriginal artist Jai Walker, of Casino, hard at work at the Jambama Arts Centre in Casino creating paintings for display at the Platypus Gallery. David Nielsen

FORGET the share market; the Platypus Gallery in Casino could be the spot to make a decent investment.

The gallery, at the Casino Visitors Information Centre, will soon host a sale of some of the best Aboriginal art by artists based at Casino’s Jambama Gallery.

The art ranges in price from $60 up to $750, with the majority of the work on sale for less than $200.

Jambama artist Jai Walker will be one of the painters whose work will be soon be on display.

He said his art, which often depicts emotive silhouettes of Aboriginal fig-ures, was a mixture of traditional and contemporary Aboriginal painting.

“I like to paint knowledge,” he said.

“Someone will share a thought with me, and then I like to paint it like it’s a proper picture.

“No one is really talking about knowledge, so I paint it.”

Richmond Valley Council events and cultural officer Peter Byrne encouraged art lovers to take advantage of the work on display from the Jambama artists.

“Since the early 1970s Aboriginal contemporary art has grown rapidly and with amazing diversity and vigour, to the extent that critic Robert Hughes has described it as ‘the last great art movement of the 20th Century’,” he said.

Mr Byrne said the Jambama art will make a great investment.

“Unlike other collectables, you canenjoy art every day without reducing its value. In fact art has the unique and enduring benefit of potential appreciation in value as it hangs on your wall,” he said.

“A ‘buy and hold’ strategy, long regarded as a key to successful wealth creation, is easy when the ‘holding’ part of the strategy is so rewarding.”

The art goes on sale at the Casino Visitors Information Centre from March 5 and will be on display until sold.



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