The steel skate park at Nimbin that was closed in 2005 after residents complained about the noise.
The steel skate park at Nimbin that was closed in 2005 after residents complained about the noise.

Nimbin to get skate park at Peace

LISMORE City Council will push ahead with plans to build Nimbin’s new skate park at thevillage’s Peace Park, despite concerns about the impact the facility would have on the amount of green space at the park.

The council heard the push for a new skate park had overwhelming support, with a survey finding 90 per cent of the village wanting a new facility to replace the steel one that was shut down after complaints about the noise.

The steel skate park was built with huge community support. Residents chipped in thousands of hours of work and, alongside a TURSA Work for the Dole project, built a facility that caught the eye of some of the world’s top skaters and, in 2004, came close to winning a national award.

However, work on the park stopped in 2005 after neighbours started complaining about the amount of noise skaters made rocketing down the steel ramps. Efforts to reduce the noise continued until last year when the council decided it would be better to scrap the facility and build a new concrete one.

Tuesday’s meeting heard most of the community backed the Peace Park site, with 60 per cent of residents in favour of it. However there were concerns the new facility would take out much of the green space at the park.

The council heard more green space could be made through green restoration around the park – by removing camphor laurel trees and other weeds.

However, Lismore City Council asset manager Scott Turner told councillors there was no separate funding for that work and anyenvironmental work done on the site would be done at the expense of the skate park facility.

Tuesday’s decision cleared the way for council staff to get to work on the skate park, with issues around environmental work and park design to be sorted out during that process.

The other issue to be resolved was the existing skate park’s fate.

Tuesday’s meeting heard the job of getting rid of it had been left to the village’s community centre.

Nimbin skating enthusiast Elan ‘Trout’ Christian, who was one of the people who contributed to the construction of the skate park, wanted to move the skate park to his place on the village outskirts.

Mr Christian said the concrete facility being planned by the council would be unlikely to meet the standard set by the steel park and, if it went to his place, it could still be used by the village’s experienced skaters and as a training facility for new skaters.



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