Farmers Lorraine and Allan Tickle, of Irvington, near Casino, braved the rain yesterday to attend the weekly cattle sale at the Lismore saleyards, where they received a higher than expected price for their cattle.
Farmers Lorraine and Allan Tickle, of Irvington, near Casino, braved the rain yesterday to attend the weekly cattle sale at the Lismore saleyards, where they received a higher than expected price for their cattle. Jay Cronan

Wet weather causes havoc

THE constant wet weather across the region, while not in danger of causing floods, has created havoc in certain areas.

Robyn and David Everson, of Coraki, have had to contend with overflowing drains and sewerage in their garage.

“We’ve never had thewater come up this bad,” Mr Everson said.

“It’s covered the driveway and filled the drains and we can’t get the car out.”

Despite many letters being written to Richmond Valley Council regarding the inadequacy of the drains in their street, the Eversons have only ever received a letter from council telling them that they live in the wrong part of town.

Cold comfort for the Eversons as they stayed trapped in their home due to the recent heavy rain.

“David’s in a wheelchair and if I need to get him somewhere for whatever reason, it makes it difficult,” Mrs Everson said.

“Council seems happy to take our rates, even though we live in the ‘wrong part of town’.”

While The Northern Star was at the Everson’s home, council workers came to fix the cause of the problem.

Terry Seymour, manager for water and sewerage at Richmond Valley Council, advised The Northern Star they had received 26 reports of sewerage overflows yesterday, with three in Coraki and 23 in Casino.

“The function of the system is such that it is experiencing an event beyond its capacity to deal with the water effectively,” he said.

Without a break in the rain even the farmers were starting to feel the effects.

Cattle farmers Lorraine and Allan Tickle, of Irvington, near Casino, said that in the last four days their property had received 130mm to 150mm of rain.

“It’s very good as it puts water back in the ground,” Mrs Tickle said.

“But it can stop now. We’ve had enough.”

Darren Winkler, deputyregional controller of the Richmond-Tweed SES, does not have any major concerns for flooding at this time.

“I’ve been speaking to the Bureau of Meteorology a couple of times and they are confident the rain will ease,” he said.

“There is some localised flash flooding, but no concerns of river flooding.

“We would need something pretty major, like 50mm in three to four hours, for it to flood.”

However, Mr Winkler said the possibility of floods this month was a concern as the bureau was predicting a wet March and with the ground already wet due to recent rain it would not take much to cause a flood.

All major roads throughout the Northern Rivers were still open yesterday. A number of country roads were affected by water on the road.



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