Len Boyle (left) with his family on their property.
Len Boyle (left) with his family on their property. The Northern Star

One century on the land for Boyles

DESPITE a broken promise, the Boyle family has prospered on their land at Goolmangar for 100 years.

“When people see the sign Boyle Road they think we must have done it easy. They think we must have inherited this place,” Len Boyle said.

But the truth is far more interesting.

The Boyles first set foot on the 700 acres they would one day own, in 1908. Len's grandfather, Michael Boyle, came from the south coast of NSW with his 12 children and a herd of dairy cows on a train. They got off at Tenterfield and walked the herd to Goolmangar.

The property was owned by the Macintyres, a childless couple who had selected the land in 1868. They promised the Boyles that if they worked the land with them, it would be bequeathed to them.

However, when the widow Grace Macintyre died in 1923, it was discovered the property had been left to the Catholic Church.

Mr Boyle's father and uncles stayed on as tenants, but it would be more than 48 years before they could afford to purchase the property.

“We bought it bit by bit,” Mr Boyle said.

For more than 50 years Mr Boyle ran the property as a dairy farm and piggery with his brother Michael. He and wife, Carmel, raised their five children, John, Richard, Frank, Helen and Phillip. They still live in one of the property's homes.

Twenty years ago, Mr Boyle's son, Frank, restored the original homestead, Marlivalle, which had become derelict. He now lives there with his wife, Andrea, and daughters Emily, Jessica and Sophie.

On Boxing Day the Boyles celebrate their century at Goolmangar. They are expecting more than 100 people to join the celebration.



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