Rebecca Ryall and her daughter Mally Ryall, 5, at Rebecca’s Team Medical stall at the Nourishing Nimbin Food Festival.
Rebecca Ryall and her daughter Mally Ryall, 5, at Rebecca’s Team Medical stall at the Nourishing Nimbin Food Festival. Megan Kinninment

Nimbin nuts it out on local food

EATING 100% locally grown produce isn't nearly as hard as it sounds and if you are going to give it a try, Nimbin is the place to start according to organisers of the Nourishing Nimbin Food festival.

The festival showcasing local sustainable food was held on the weekend and was the culmination of 18 months of community consultation funded by Food Link, event co-ordinator Ashlee Jones said.

The festival was an initiative of the Nimbin Neighbourhood Centre and the Nimbin Food Security Network, Ms Jones said, with the aim of linking consumers directly with food producers.

"As we've been exposing local food producers to the public, people have easier access to local food and feel more informed about what is in season," she said.

"You can eat nearly all of your food from within the Nimbin bio-region.

"We have so many independent growers and a wide range of value-added and locally produced foods such as cheese, pasta, bread, coffee, milk and rain-fed grains.

"There are some gaps with dairy and beef regulations and de-regulations, but within the Nimbin bio-region you could potentially eat up to 70% of your diet from locally produced food.

"You would be eating a very fresh and healthy diet that way.

"Nimbin is unique in that we have the climate for producing as well as the networking and community access."

The Nourishing Nimbin event showcased a range of foods on offer locally as well as talks and demonstrations on growing your own food, including grains, cheese-making and even how to dress a rooster.

Rebecca Ryall of Lillian Rock had a stall at the festival selling her Tea Medica range of organic teas.

The trained herbalist started the business six months ago and aims to get all of her ingredients from local sources.

"All my teas are organic and 85% are Australian ingredients, but I would like that to become 100% locally grown," Ms Ryall said.

Her tea range is based on traditional herbal medicine and is an easy way to take control of your health, she said.

"Tea Medica is about re-connecting people with their ability to impact on their own health," she said.

"It's hard to do damage to yourself drinking tea."

 

Do you grow your own food? Leave a comment below.



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