WISING UP: Landcare coordinator Tanya Jobling, farmer Andrew O'Dea and Minister for Drought David Littleproud with a jug of clear water from Mr O'Dea's creek, where he has used natural sequence techniques to restore natural water cycles.
WISING UP: Landcare coordinator Tanya Jobling, farmer Andrew O'Dea and Minister for Drought David Littleproud with a jug of clear water from Mr O'Dea's creek, where he has used natural sequence techniques to restore natural water cycles. Chris Lines

New technique to help landowners survive drought

A TECHNIQUE to restore natural water cycles and help the land survive drought has won the confidence of the Federal Government.

The Condamine Headwaters Landcare Group secured $99,500 of federal funds to launch a training program based on Natural Sequence Farming.

The funds comes from the government Small Farms Small Grants program.

Natural sequence farming is a rural landscape management technique that aims to restore natural water cycles to help land survive drought conditions.

CHLG coordinator Tanya Jobling said they would use the funds to launch a series of field days and training courses to teach landowners to become better land managers.

"With Natural Sequence Farming we want to change how landowners think about managing their land," she said.

"The techniques will help land become more resilient against drought and floods."

The funding announcement was made by Drought Minister David Littleproud at Andrew O'Dea's farm in Elbow Valley.

Mr O'Dea has used natural sequence techniques to help restore life to a previously dry waterway on his farm.

"Basically we are trying to restore the land to what it was before the white fellas came," he said.

By creating small rock structures in his river, Mr O'Dea created a series of ponds full of clear water surrounded by a green hydrated river bank.

 

Landcare Coordinator Tanya Jobling, farmer Andrew O'Dea and Minister for Drought David Littleproud observe Mr O'Dea's restored creek.
Landcare Coordinator Tanya Jobling, farmer Andrew O'Dea and Minister for Drought David Littleproud observe Mr O'Dea's restored creek. Chris Lines

His farm is one of three where Landcare field days will be held.

Killarney farmer Paul Graham will also show his property, where he has implemented the natural sequence system for eight years. He said the system restored the biodiversity balance on his land.

"If I look outside and don't see wildlife, I wonder what's gone wrong, and, if I look and don't see fat cattle, I also wonder what's gone wrong."



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