IT was the "groovy 60s" and The Beatles were in full "swing" when the parents of young Jimmy Chiu, a 10-year-old living in Hong Kong, discouraged him from listening to music.

Living in Alstonville for the past 27 years, Jimmy Chiu is now a GP who alternates his days between his practice at the Alstonville Clinic and playing guitar for jazz band Acid Bleed.

Dr Chiu said medicine was his calling, but music had always been a passion, although he only allowed himself to explore it as an adult.

He said his band played "pulp jazz". "(It's) a name we made up as we do a very personal mix of different music and some improvisation," Dr Chiu said.

Although he learnt to play guitar during his college years, it was after his wife encouraged him to take some lessons that he discovered jazz and joined a band.

"I asked the teacher to show me some Crowded House songs, but he said: 'Don't do that, I'll teach you jazz!' and that's how I discovered it and fell in love with it," he said.

So why is jazz music such a good fit?

"Jazz is good for me because of my lack of theory and lack of discipline. I have very little time to learn the theory," he said.

Acid Bleed plays every month at the Tatts Hotel in Lismore and their next gig is on May 24 from 6pm.

Dr Chiu is joined in the band by other local professionals, Andrew Horowitz, Adam Blenkhorn, Josh Kirk, Pete Costin-Neilsen and new vocalist, Jude Sweeney, who share a similar passion for music.



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