SONIC BOOM: A meteorite filmed at the Gold Coast heads for the Great Dividing Range.
SONIC BOOM: A meteorite filmed at the Gold Coast heads for the Great Dividing Range. Contributed Deslee Oldham Facebo

Meteor buzz rocks region

A ROCK hurtling towards Earth from space made itself known in Killarney in a huge way on Sunday night.

People from all over southern Queensland spotted a large, bright meteor about 6pm and shortly after social media in Killarney on the Southern Downs lit up with residents reporting a huge bang.

Footage online, taken from Runaway Bay on the Gold Coast clearly showed the bright object heading towards the Great Dividing Range before disappearing.

But it was reports of a house-shaking thud in Killarney that really got social media buzzing.

Facebook user Brigitte Jones posted, "I felt it out here, the house shook."

Killarney resident Krissy Bloomfield said, "On Brosnan Rd the kids saw what we thought shooting star just before the bang."

Queen Mary Falls Caravan Park and Cafe owner Louise Reed said she had been sitting with guests around a camp fire when the meteor came over.

"We were having a lovely time when one of the guests pointed out a shooting star," Mrs Reed said.

"But it was much too big for that and really bright.

"It passed directly over the top of us, heading east then a moment later, we all heard the noise."

Mrs Reed said it sounded like thunder or fireworks.

"But it went on for too long for thunder," she said.

"It's created a real buzz up here, everyone's talking about it and the TV crews are on their way as well.

"It's pretty crazy to think something that's probably travelled millions of kilometres through space would end up right here."

 

 

BIG BANG: Killarney man John Towells looks to the skies after a meteor rocked Killarney on Sunday night.
BIG BANG: Killarney man John Towells looks to the skies after a meteor rocked Killarney on Sunday night. Jonno Colfs

In Killarney the sound was much louder, according to resident Bonnie Bell.

"It was like a truck convoy on the highway but 10 times louder," she said.

Former Warwick State High School teacher and astronomy enthusiast Stuart Watt said the bang over Killarney was probably a sonic boom as the meteor entered denser air.

"But as it was observed from northern New South Wales, it definitely didn't land close-by," he said.

"My guess is it is one of the pi-Puppid meteor shower which matches the radiant.

"The descriptions and video match previous observations."

Springbrook Research Observatory owner Andre Clayden said meteors can travel at tremendous speed.

"It's highly likely a sonic boom has caused shock waves," he said.

"Which would explain why people felt their houses shake."

Killarney resident John Towells said it wasn't the first time such an occurrence had happened in Killarney.

"There was a similar event about 20 years ago," he said. "And in 2007, people saw a fireball out Cherrabah way and thought it might be a plane going down.

"There were search parties and I was sent out there to have a look but in the end they put it down to being a meteor getting close to Earth."



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