William Shakespeare knew how to insult properly.
William Shakespeare knew how to insult properly. CONTRIBUTED

Looking for a good insult 'ye fat guts!'?

A NUMBER of statements made by state Liberal MP Dr Peter Phelps recently showcased the creativity that can be found in a well placed insult.

He was speaking in regards to the backflip decision made by Premier Mike Baird on the greyhound industry ban.

He called those who supported the initial ban as 'careerist weasels', 'spineless blancmanges' and 'lick-spittle yes men'.

Politics

It reminded us of another politician who was well-known for some colourful and creative words used on his opponents, namely Labor politician and ex-Prime Minister Paul Keating.

Mr Keating would often let fly with such gems as:

"What we have got is a dead carcass, swinging in the breeze, but nobody will cut it down to replace him.” or

"He is the greatest job and investment destroyer since the bubonic plague.” and finally

"(His performance) is like being flogged with a warm lettuce.”

Entertainment

In the entertainment world we just can't go past some of the classic lines from actor WC Fields.

He was the epitome of a mysognistic drunk, but people laughed at his wit.

"Women are like elephants. I like to look at 'em, but I wouldn't want to own one.” and

"I like children - fried.”

Literature

The famous playwright Oscar Wilde peppered his plays with inciteful insults that entertained.

In his play The Importance of Being Earnest there were some classics:

"I love hearing my relations abused. It is the only thing that makes me put up with them at all” and

"I never saw anybody take so long to dress, and with such little result.”

Then there is the king of English literature whose words and phrases we use more often than most.

William Shakespeare knew how to throw around insults in many of his plays.

"Thy tongue outvenoms all the worms of Nile.” or

"Methinkst thou art a general offence and every man should beat thee.” and

"Thou clay-brained guts, thou knotty-pated fool, thou whoreson obscene greasy tallow-catch!” and finally

"There's no more faith in thee than in a stewed prune.”



'No one said anything': Advocate calls on police to step in

premium_icon 'No one said anything': Advocate calls on police to step in

Advocate hopes inquiry will encourage police to call out misconduct

Your chance to see the best gardens in Lismore

Your chance to see the best gardens in Lismore

Learn the secrets of the region's green thumbs

Tragedy struck this young family

Tragedy struck this young family

Struggles of a pioneering Italian family

Local Partners