Troubled start: Newcomers, radiation therapists Dean Wharton (pictured) and Heather Rees, lost nearly all their possessions when their newly rented home at Goonellabah was broken into last Wednesday.
Troubled start: Newcomers, radiation therapists Dean Wharton (pictured) and Heather Rees, lost nearly all their possessions when their newly rented home at Goonellabah was broken into last Wednesday. Jay Cronan

Therapists' new house burgled

TWO of Lismore’s most eagerly awaited health professionals received a rude welcome when their house was burgled last week.

Radiation therapists Dean Wharton and his partner Heather Rees, who arrived from Melbourne two weeks ago to begin work at the new cancer clinic at Lismore Base Hospital, lost most of their possessions after their newly rented Goonellabah home was burgled last Wednesday.

“It’s so disappointing, we just moved here with the bare essentials and now it’s gone,” Mr Wharton said.

“They stole our laptops, MP3 players, cameras, a new camcorder, and a fantastic flat screen television that our new neighbour had lent us until our stuff arrived.”

Although the couple hadn’t organised content insurance yet, Mr Wharton explained that the value of most of what was stolen was negligible – it was the sense of invasion and loss of their irreplaceable belongings that hurt most.

“They also went through all our papers and took our British credit cards as well as 17 months worth of photos,” he said.

Most of those photos were of the couple’s 17-month-old baby and Mr Wharton hoped that someone may have the decency to return them.

“We thought we’d moved to paradise and then this happens,” he said.

“Right now we’re just trying to get the house to feel like ours again.

“It’s a beautiful house but I think we’ll be moving out when the lease runs out.

“The landlord has promised to fix the locks but it seems (the thieves) knew where to go and how to get in.

A next-door-neighbour who lent the couple the television was equally upset.

“I feel very sorry for them. It would be very disconcerting,” she said.

“This was such a quiet area with good people – a very caring community.

Mr Wharton and Ms Rees are two of eight radiation therapists brought to Lismore to operate the long awaited linear accelerator at the new cancer clinic.

With a second machine expected to be operational in the next six months, more radiation therapists will be required here and word has spread quickly through the relatively small profession about the trouble Mr Wharton and Ms Rees have encountered.

“It’s a very small community. There are only about 200 of us in the country and everyone in Melbourne knows about it now,” he said.



Shock decision to withdraw sand mine application

Shock decision to withdraw sand mine application

The controversial expansion will not go ahead at this stage

'Amazing' fighter plane will be big drawcard at Lismore expo

'Amazing' fighter plane will be big drawcard at Lismore expo

The RAAF Hawk's top speed is 1200km/h

1000-year-old tree hidden on farmer's property

premium_icon 1000-year-old tree hidden on farmer's property

He planted 30,000 rainforest saplings before finding a big surprise

Local Partners