HOT DIGGITY DOG: Lismore Council ranger Russel Davis with a recent guest at the city pound. Mr Davis said the pound is able to reunite or rehome 95 per cent of the animals which find their way to the facility.
HOT DIGGITY DOG: Lismore Council ranger Russel Davis with a recent guest at the city pound. Mr Davis said the pound is able to reunite or rehome 95 per cent of the animals which find their way to the facility. Alison Paterson

Lismore pound's new leash on life for dogs

RANGER Russell Davis loves his job at the Lismore Pound so much he ended up taking a rescue dog home.

As one of five rangers working for Lismore Council, for the past 11 years Mr Davis has been responsible for helping lost, strayed or dumped dogs and cats find their original owners or a new loving home.

In fact he even fell for one Labrador X who came in without any identifying collar or microchip.

"He needs a tick removed so I took him to the vet, called him Rex and ended up taking him home,” he said.

"He's a really good dog.”

Mr Davis said the rangers are proud of their ability to reunite or re-home 95 per cent of the lost or dumped animals which are guests of the pound.

"The majority of dogs we get here are staffys or kelpies,” he said.

"Around 250 dogs a year come through our doors and the little dogs and the puppies are adopted out very quickly.”

Mr Davis said around 66 per cent of animals are reunited with their owners, thanks to collar or microchip details or people calling around the animal welfare groups.

"We also liaise with other lost animal groups through social media all along the coast as far south as Victoria and up through Queensland,” he said.

"Around two-thirds of animals we mange to find their owners and the other third are adopted out and thankfully, we euthanise very few animals these days, only if they are very sick or dangerous.”

Good relations with the Lismore community and animal welfare groups help the rangers to reunite and re-home animals, he said.

"If your animal is missing, give us a call as not enough people think to call the pound,” he said.

"And I wish people would remember to update their details such as when they change phone numbers so when can call them when their pet turns up here.”

Giving his latest guest a pat, Mr Davis said every time they reunite a pet wit h a family or find new owners for an animal, he feels he has the best job in the world.

"This is very satisfying work,” he said.



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