Despite the convenience not everyone loves Aldi’s pre-cut carrots. Picture: Instagram/Aldi Lovers Australia.
Despite the convenience not everyone loves Aldi’s pre-cut carrots. Picture: Instagram/Aldi Lovers Australia.

‘Lazy’ $2 Aldi item causes outrage

It's become all too easy to reach for a plastic bag of pre-cut fruit or veg at the supermarket - and not everyone is happy about it.

Aldi's latest addition to its fresh produce range, pre-cut carrot sticks and sliced carrot, has sparked outrage among shoppers who labelled it a "crazy" and an unnecessary use of plastic.

Photos were shared of "ready to go" veggies were shared by Aldi Lovers Australia Instagram page, sparking plenty of negative comments from shoppers.

This photo of Aldi pre-cut carrots sparked outrage when it was shared on Instagram. Picture: Instagram/Aldi Lovers Australia
This photo of Aldi pre-cut carrots sparked outrage when it was shared on Instagram. Picture: Instagram/Aldi Lovers Australia

"Plastic plastic plastic. Just chop your damn vegetables yourself peeps," one frustrated person wrote, while another added: "Crazy over use of plastic again."

"Wow! That's a lot of packaging to save 30 secs chopping time," a shopper wrote.

"I really wish @aldiaustralia would do less of this … surely LESS plastic wrapped food is what we need?!" one person commented.

However, some pointed out the packaged carrots would make meal prep easier, and it was hard to avoid plastic in supermarkets.

"If you buy a bag of carrots they come in plastic anyway," one person wrote.

Aldi Lovers Australia also responded to the controversy, writing in an Instagram story that the judgment was "sad", and shoppers should stop assuming people who bought pre-cut vegetables were"lazy".

Aldi Lovers Australia hit back at the controversy. Picture: Instagram/Aldi Lovers Australia.
Aldi Lovers Australia hit back at the controversy. Picture: Instagram/Aldi Lovers Australia.


It's not the first time the use of plastic in supermarkets has sparked outrage.

While single-use plastic bags were banned from Coles and Woolworths in 2018, Australia's major supermarkets have continued to come under fire.

Frustrated shoppers have taken to social media to complain about the amount of packaging on fresh produce, even items that already have a protective skin such as bananas or avocados.

But RMIT University's sustainable products and packaging expert Simon Lockrey previously told news.com.au that the issue wasn't just about convenience.

 

"Packaging is generally designed to protect fresh produce and extend shelf life," Dr Lockrey said.

"For instance, some studies have shown large cucumbers to have an extended shelf life from a few days to over 20 days by using plastic film. Other food types have varying performance characteristics along these lines.

"This allows produce to be delivered from further away and last longer so there is more chance it will be purchased and consumed. So, basically, there is a balancing act between packaging and food waste."



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