Tenterfield Show hosted local and NRA affiliated rodeo events including barrel racing, novice and open bull rude, Tenterfield Championship Open Saddle Ride, open bare back and junior bull ride.
Tenterfield Show hosted local and NRA affiliated rodeo events including barrel racing, novice and open bull rude, Tenterfield Championship Open Saddle Ride, open bare back and junior bull ride. Connor Milliken

PHOTOS: Beating the drought at the Tenterfield Show

SUPPORTING the mental health and well being of drought affected farmers in NSW was a key component of Tenterfield Show this year and headline comedy act the Crackup Sisters were there to give everyone a good laugh.

Over the weekend the annual show which has been running for 142 years, comped Tenterfield residents with a free ticket to experience a full schedule of agricultural exhibits and events that took their mind off a prolonged lack of rainfall.

 

Tenterfield Show Society President Matthew Duff said the society 'were very lucky this year' to be granted funds by the Federal Government that allowed them to offer discounted access to the event.

"We offered free entry because of the drought, to let people of the land come in and catch up with mates instead of being at home on the farm," Mr. Duff said.

Performance duo Twiggs and S.T.Ruth known as the Crackup Sisters were a huge hit at the event, entertaining audience with slapstick comedy and knock about acrobatics which is a traditional form of Australian acrobatics.

'Knock about acrobatics is about humour in movement," Ms Twiggs said.

"Crackup Sisters are 10 years old this year and were born out of the desire to make a lot of comedy and to make performance for and in rural and remote Australia," Ms S.T.Ruth said.

"It's a big honour to bring comedy and make people laugh, to share stories and see them use their imagination. It's a very old form of live entertainment."

The pair, originally from the central west town of Winton are well aware of the challenges faced by communities living with extreme climates experienced in rural town of NSW.

"It's lovely to be keeping this form of entertainment alive and seeing everybody, both young and old, enjoy it," Ms. S.T. Ruth said.

"It's all been very positive, everyone has really engaged with us and wants to talk at the end and I think that's what it is about. It's about engaging with the audience and then having the audience engage with each other and then coming together and creating conversation," Ms. Twiggs said.

Other entertainment keeping the community happy were main events such as the fireworks display, the local and NRA rodeo, prime lamb judging and the demolition derby.

Tenterfield Show Society hoped to raise $6000 - $8000 which will be donated to drought relief organizations that assist farmers to access hay and water in the Tenterfield shire.



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