The first day of kindy at St Carthage’s primary school in Lismore, from left, Kyle McLean, 11 in Year 6, Daniel Davis, 5 in kindergarten and Bailey Kent, 11 in Year 6.
The first day of kindy at St Carthage’s primary school in Lismore, from left, Kyle McLean, 11 in Year 6, Daniel Davis, 5 in kindergarten and Bailey Kent, 11 in Year 6. Mireille Merlet-Shaw

Kindy can be tough for parents

THE first day of school can be as nerve-racking for parents as for their children.

Yesterday, thousands of parents dropped the children off to class for their first full week and had to adapt to not having the little ones around.

Tina Schilling of Goonellabah has three children, and her oldest, Lachlan, 5, started kindergarten at St Carthage's Primary School in Lismore yesterday.

Although it was a completely new experience for Ms Schilling, she seemed surprisingly calm.

"I felt a bit nervous this morning but he was really excited," she said.

"He just wanted to go to school and be a big boy. Lots of kids in our street go to school so he wanted to fit in and get in the uniform. I think if he was upset, then I would have been too, but he was just excited, so I fed off him."

Lucy Night, 5, also had her first day at St Carthage's, but hers didn't go entirely to plan.

"I went on the bus to school and I got sick. I vomited in Chloe's hat. I was sick from the turns of the bus and it was hot in there," Lucy said.

She was lucky enough to have two older sisters at the same school to look after her.

Lucy's classmate, Daniel Davis, 5, was revelling in the new experience.

"I just wanted to come down here and practise how to be a big school person," he said.

"I've been playing with Joseph, then Sarah and then my buddy."

St Carthage's kindergarten teacher Teonie Flynn said everything ran smoothly yesterday.

"The kids have been really settled - parents have brought them in and I haven't had any tears. Some parents might have had tears outside," she said.

However, Ms Flynn insisted that parents of the school's kindergarten students had nothing to worry about.

"We've got a really successful buddy system set up. Year-six students spend their lunch times with them (kindergarten students) and they come in and help them pack their bags. If they're catching the bus, we team them up with a bus buddy," she explained.

"When the kids start to catch the buses, parents can travel free with their kids, so they can travel with them to and from school for the first day or so."

Ms Flynn had some tips for nervous parents.

"If you've got a question, ask the question, however silly it may seem. It will calm you down," she said.

"In our newsletters there's always messages, so you're always kept in contact with what's happening at the school. Always read that literature that comes home and check bags for notes.

"Keep reassuring them (your kids) that it's okay. The teachers have lots of things in place to ensure the smooth transition of the children into that new life."

 

Surviving Kindy

(A guide for parents)

  • Ask your child's teacher questions
  • Find your child a school buddy
  • Read school newsletters
  • Check your child's bag for notes
  • Reassure your child that everything is okay


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