From left, Shannan Ponton, Michelle Bridges and Steve 'Commando' Willis star in the new TV series The Biggest Loser: The Next Generation.
From left, Shannan Ponton, Michelle Bridges and Steve 'Commando' Willis star in the new TV series The Biggest Loser: The Next Generation. Contributed - Network Ten

Keeping it in the family

LIKE father like son - that's the trend the Biggest Loser trainers hope to break.

The new series of the weight-loss show focuses on overweight parents and their children in an effort to break the cycle of generational obesity.

Returning in their never-ending battle to fight the bulge are trainers Shannan Ponton, Michelle Bridges and Commando Steve.

"People can talk and talk all day about people's point of views and the way things should be done but let's deal with the issue that's most important, that can either put a person in the ground or reduce their quality of life the fastest, and that's obesity," Steve "Commando" Willis told The Guide during a recent set visit.

"I've got a five-year-old and an 18-month-old and I can draw parallels between those children at such a young age and some of the 19 and 20-year-olds who are here. I can see the habits and it's scary.

"If you don't get control of that at such a young age you essentially create monsters as you allow them to have more and more rope. It's the same rope that entangles them and trips them up time and time again."

The Biggest Loser: The Next Generation - Ten - Sunday at 6.45pm, Monday and Tuesday at 7.30pm

Seven pairs of fathers, mothers, daughters and sons are taking up the Biggest Loser challenge.

They think they know what they're in for, but of course the show's producers have a few surprises up their sleeves for Sunday's series eight premiere.

The contestants range in age from 53-year-old Mandy Martin, from WA, to 15-year-old Todd Nester from Victoria.

The new series has hit home for host Hayley Lewis, who was touched by Todd's story.

"Being a parent to a 15-year-old and a nine-year-old, the saddest day for me was listening to his story and the issues and the journey he'd been on in his short 15 years," she said.

"I couldn't help but stand there listening to his story and think about where my 15-year-old is at and think about the opportunities he's had with his sport and his health and there was this poor kid who had grown up in obviously a very loving family but just didn't have any direction in terms of healthy eating.

"He's been bullied in school and it's going to resonate with a lot of parents and kids at home because there are so many kids across Australia every day dealing with weight and being bullied at school."

Other key changes in the new series include a new Biggest Loser house, double scale for team weigh-ins and for the first time in the show's history, a team will win the Biggest Loser title rather than an individual.



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