Wildlife workers struggle to keep up with casualties

A KOALA joey is on the mend, three months after being stomped on by a cow while being carried by his mother, at a paddock in Lismore.

But the Gold Coast wildlife hospital which treated "Fraser" said its resources were over- stretched trying to keep up with a rise in casualties.

Currumbin Wildlife Hospital has treated more than 9000 animals this year, 1000 more than last year.

There's been a 30% increase in the number of koalas treated, with about a third of those from the Northern Rivers.

Hospital senior veterinarian Michael Pyne said a cow attacked Fraser and his mother, killing the mother.

"Cows have a thing about koalas, it's a bit hard to know why," Dr Pyne said.

"It's not unusual for koalas to be stomped on by cows, it's almost like they seek them out," he said.

"Mum was literally stomped to death and the little joey had a broken arm and broken leg.

"Three months on, he has a chest infection and some gut problems, as koalas have very sensitive intestines and he was pretty messed up."

Dr Pyne said the increase in the number of koalas admitted to the hospital was caused by increased urbanisation.



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