Christian Wilcocks in her studio on the Byron Arts and Industry Estate
Christian Wilcocks in her studio on the Byron Arts and Industry Estate

Inspiration in the concrete jungle

WHEN it comes to creating art Christine Wilcock's prefers concrete to rainforest.

Her home is set amongst the rainforest on the edge of Mullumbimy Creek and her studio is is in a factory unit on the Byron Arts and Industry Estate.

"Just give me a bit of cenment," she said.

"There is a vibrancy down here, there are framers, art supplie shops and other other artists close by.

"At any time a fellow artist may walk into my studio and give me some instant feedback on my work.

"At home its beautiful but too isolating and I don't find that stimulating. But it is where all my love of natural world comes from."

Ms Wilcox's last exhibition, Museum of Nothing Special was on show at the Lismore Regional Gallery in October 2012.

The exhibition incorporated many objects and symbols from the natural world including birds and butterflies.

The mixed media show also included the fictionalised story of a butterfly collector.

It also included a giant butterfly net and a set of delicate etchings of a non-existent species of butterflies.

The inclusion of this false collection was designed to play with the audiences perceptions of museums and galleries

"I am looking at the way we as an audience are directed by the displays and the authoritive voice of the museum or gallery," Ms Wilcocks said.

Wilcock's well organised studio itself has the the look and feel of a museum.

Neatly arranged on the studio shelves are and eclectic collection of objects including small ceramics alongside old wooden office paraphenalia and shells together with glass display domes.

"I just naturally collect things and bring them home," she said.

"I like natural objects but I have realised that it is about the colour, its the sepia that I am attracted to and feeling of the past."

There are also a number of well maintained display cases one of them dating from the 1940's.

"One of the things realised was that when you put things behind glass it conferes a specialness on the object and the audience really responds to that," she said.



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