BACK HOME: Rachel Beck will return to her home town of Alstonville to perform in a theatre production about the life of Second World War nurse and prisoner of war Jessie “Blanchie” Blanch, who was also raised on the plateau.
BACK HOME: Rachel Beck will return to her home town of Alstonville to perform in a theatre production about the life of Second World War nurse and prisoner of war Jessie “Blanchie” Blanch, who was also raised on the plateau.

New play celebrates Alstonville WWII nurse Blanchie Blanch

THE life of Alstonville Second World War nurse and prisoner of war Jessie "Blanchie" Blanch is the subject of a new theatre production.

The production, Remnants, was written and directed by new Alstonville resident John Senczuk and will star former Alstonville woman Rachel Beck.

Mr Senczuk, who recently moved from Perth, said a visit to the Alstonville Plateau Historical Society where he read Ian Kirkland's short biography of Blanchie inspired the production.

"Her story is astonishing," he said.

Details

Where: Alstonville Leisure and Entertainment Centre

When: July 24 at 7.30pm and July 25 at 2pm and 7.30pm

Cost: Tickets are $35 for adults, $27 for concessions and $18 for students

Bookings: Phone 6628 3533

"Remarkable for not only her stoic resistance, her strong survival instincts and selfless concern for her colleagues during her incarceration by the Japanese, butalso for her no-nonsense philosophy of 'getting on with things' and a brilliant sense of humour."

The pair have a long theatrical partnership including Ms Beck's Sydney Theatre Company debut in Sondheim's A Little Night Music (1991), which Mr Senczuk designed.

A decade ago, Ms Beck also starred in Mr Senczuk's musical Eureka! - which headlined the 2004 Melbourne Festival.

Ms Beck said she was delighted to be coming home to take on the role of Blanchie.

"It's been a long time since I've actually performed in front of a home crowd. It's very exciting," she said.

Remnants follows Blanchie after her return to Alstonville to marry Sydney photographer Albert Eaton-Lee on her 40th birthday.

Many in Alstonville are surprised, given Blanchie's history.

She enlisted to tend solders in Malaya in 1941 and was evacuated when the Japanese invaded the Malayan Peninsula.

Blanchie was shipwrecked and taken prisoner, spending the next three-and-a-half years in the hell camps of Sumatra.



Horrific kitchen accident led to woman's new business

premium_icon Horrific kitchen accident led to woman's new business

This North Coast woman needed a new purpose in life

Rail trail riders could introduce mad cow disease

premium_icon Rail trail riders could introduce mad cow disease

Biosecurity risk of proposed rail trail is very real, says reader

Police officer could face criminal charges over arrest

Police officer could face criminal charges over arrest

The officer's actions fell into a "very large grey area"

Local Partners