Getting ready to party for Halloween are (from left) Yogita Gupta of Ballina and Nicole Pacanowski from Pennsylvania, US, who is living in Lismore.
Getting ready to party for Halloween are (from left) Yogita Gupta of Ballina and Nicole Pacanowski from Pennsylvania, US, who is living in Lismore.

Halloween is creeping up on us

WHILE SOME reject it as an American tradition with no place in Australia, others see Halloween as a great chance to get dressed up and eat sweets.

Halloween is seen by some as originating in a pagan holiday to honour the dead, apparently it dates from the ancient Celtic harvest festival, Samhain, more than 2000 years ago.

In Australia, Halloween is increasingly marked by children who watch horror films and play trick-or-treat and adults who like to party in spooky costumes.

The owner of Let's Party Lismore, Michelle Stone, said there are plenty of Halloween parties happening on the Northern Rivers.

"I have noticed it's becoming more popular," she said. "With the economy the way it is, people are looking for a good excuse to have fun and I think they're realising it's not a commercialised American thing because it initially started in Ireland."

Ms Stone said she's experienced a last-minute rush on zombie costumes and red riding hood capes.

"A lot of people are doing cartoon characters and then you've got the standard horror costumes like vampires and sexy witches. Some are also linking it to Oktoberfest and dressing up as beer wenches because that's sexy in any season."

Woolworths Lismore staff are also getting in the spooky spirit by wearing Halloween costumes to work on Monday, according to store manager Joanne Robson.

"In the fresh food department and the deli there are really strict safety guidelines so they're limited in what they can wear but behind the checkouts you might see some hats, teeth or spiders," Ms Robson said.

Woolworths has stocked Halloween lollies and novelty items like vampire fangs, spiders, brooms and skeletons.

Pumpkins grown especially for Halloween are selling for $3.98 a kilo. "As far as I know they're not edible because they're too watery," she said. "But they are good for carving."



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