Inventor and CEO of Flow Hive Cedar Anderson collects honey from the Flow Hive with His Excellency General The Honourable David Hurley near Newrybar.
Inventor and CEO of Flow Hive Cedar Anderson collects honey from the Flow Hive with His Excellency General The Honourable David Hurley near Newrybar. Marc Stapelberg

Governor's visit sweet as honey

FROM a backyard project in The Channon to serving the future King of England, Flow Hive has come a long way since its record breaking beginning back in 2015.

Today the Governor of New South Wales David Hurley showed his passion for the hive while visiting the Beeinventive (Flow Hive) office in Newrybar.

"When I saw the invention first mentioned on TV it ticked a lot of boxes for me," Mr Hurley said.

"It's innovative, it's important to agriculture, it is important internationally and it's a NSW invention."

"I thought I would come to see the home of the Flow Hive and the inventors and just enjoy what they have done here."

 

Inventor and CEO of Flow Hive Cedar Anderson collects honey from the Flow Hive with His Excellency General The Honourable David Hurley near Newrybar.
Inventor and CEO of Flow Hive Cedar Anderson collects honey from the Flow Hive with His Excellency General The Honourable David Hurley near Newrybar. Marc Stapelberg

 

Inventor and CEO of Flow Hive Cedar Anderson said there are now 51,000 Flow Hives in use in 130 countries around the world.

"We started off very global, and there's quite a few issues with going global all at once," Mr Anderson said.

"Now we are actually pulling it back a little bit to the main regions, simply because it's hard to service the whole place from our little office."

Mr Hurley has installed two Flow Hives at Government House in Sydney, with honey making an excellent gift for visiting dignitaries, including fellow bee-keeper, Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall, and Charles, the Prince of Wales.

"My honey is called Isabella Honey, after the ship that brought the first European honey bees to Australia," Mr Hurley said.

"If I come across a lady or child named Isabelle or Isabella, they get a jar of honey from Government House."

"I (also) give about half of what we get to the chef at Government House, so if you come to Government House and have something sweet it's our honey."

Mr Anderson said it was fantastic to talk bees and inventions with the Governor while harvesting fresh melaleuca honey together.

"We have been going over our latest hive and looking at all improvements we have made to our Flow Hive," Mr Anderson said.

"It was great to stand back and watch him explain to everybody how the invention works and how Flow Hive works."

The Beeinventive Office is hoping to encourage more people to become new bee-keepers through their new Pollinator Support Program.

"When you become a bee-keeper you tend to start noticing the world around you and in turn the importance of our environment and the importance of our ecosystem.," Mr Anderson said.

"We have put a program together where we have got upcycled parts of Flow Hive, so made little pollinator hotels for the native solitary bees."

"They were very popular, in four days they were sold out, and we are using 100 per cent of the profits for that to fund initiatives that are supporting habitat."

You can become a bee-keeper for under $1000 by purchasing a hive off their website, https://www.honeyflow.com.au/.

"Then it is a case of looking at our videos and training material," Mr Anderson said.

Mr Hurley will continue his Northern Rivers tour in Tweed Heads tomorrow visiting Spaghetti Circus, Voice Weavers and a number of schools.

"We were in Casino only a couple of weeks ago for Beef week and then of course we were here last year for the floods," Mr Hurley said.

"I think the sustainability of local communities is important, people are very inventive in the way they do that."

"One of the things I like to do when I come into a country town is get up in the morning go for a walk around, look at how many shops are out to let and then have a sense of perhaps what is going on in the community."

"In Byron Bay I don't think I have seen an empty shop, it seems to be doing well. A lot of restaurants there that always seem to be busy, it is hard to get a seat."

"In some of the rural communities you can walk along and every four, fifth or sixth shop will be to let."



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