Drinking coffee reduces your risk of death from several diseases and conditions, which Zentveld’s coffee owner Rebecca Zentveld says is music to her ears.
Drinking coffee reduces your risk of death from several diseases and conditions, which Zentveld’s coffee owner Rebecca Zentveld says is music to her ears. Doug Eaton

Good news coffee

COFFEE lovers now have a medical reason to indulge in their favourite blend, as a recent study reveals drinking your daily caffeine hit can reduce your chance of dying from some diseases.

And the news is music to the ears of Zentveld's coffee part-owner Rebecca Zentveld.

Mrs Zentveld said the NSW North Coast produced some of the country's best coffee beans.

"Sweet, chocolatey, low in caffeine and naturally spray-free - enjoying local coffee is a better option for our health, and the environment, with real, low food miles and real fair trade for local growers a real benefit for all," she said.

"Enjoying locally grown coffee, we get the health benefits of it being naturally lower in caffeine."

But it's not just caffeinated coffee drinkers who reap the benefits, as people who drank decaffeinated were experiencing similar results.

The study published in the New England Journal of Medicine said coffee drinkers were less likely to die from several common health conditions, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes and infections than non-coffee drinkers.

Data from 400,000 adults, aged 50 to 71, was complied in the study by researchers from the American National Cancer Institute.

The study found people who drank three or more cups of coffee a day had a 10% lower risk of death from those diseases and conditions than non coffee drinkers.

Before the study, lead author Neal Freedman said little was known about the association between coffee consumption and the risk of death.

"We found coffee consumption to be associated with a lower risk of death overall, and of death from a number of different causes," he said.

"We believe these results do provide some reassurance that coffee drinking does not adversely affect health."

While she welcomed the findings, Mrs Zentveld said caffeine affected different people in different ways and people should monitor their caffeine intake.

 

DO YOU DRINK LOCALLY-GROWN COFFEE?

SMS 0428 264 948, email opinions@northernstar.com.au or leave a comment below

 



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