A scene from Gayby Baby, a documentary by director Maya Newell and producer Charlotte Mars.
A scene from Gayby Baby, a documentary by director Maya Newell and producer Charlotte Mars. Contributed

Gayby Baby doco coming to Byron Bay and Lismore

GAYBY Baby portrays the lives of four children, Gus, Ebony, Matt and Graham, who grew up with same-sex attracted parents.

For director Maya Newell, the daughter of same sex parents herself, the documentary is a celebration of diversity, something Newell says every school should be encouraging.

Earlier today, NSW Education Minister Adrian Piccoli banned the film from screening at Burwood High Girls School in Sydney this Friday during Purple Day, a date dedicated to promote positive environments for LGTBI youth.

The film is officially released nationally on September 3.

Ms Newell, 22, a former Burwood High Girls School student herself, will be in Lismore next Friday for a special screening of the film plus a Q&A with producer Charlotte Mars, organised by Northern Rivers Screenworks.

Maya Newell, director of the recently released documentary Gaby Baby.
Maya Newell, director of the recently released documentary Gaby Baby. Contributed

The director said filming took five years.

"We went our first and interviewed 30 or 40 kids from all around Australia," she said.

"We had a real responsibility to communicate what children were experiencing and to represent this new demographic of children in the Australian society."

Maya Newell said the production team was very concerned on the veracity of the documentary they were producing and the children's wellbeing.

"We took this aspect of the filmmaking very seriously," she said.

"We worked in a very unusual way with the families and children involved. All four kids were a big part of the development of the story and of the edit process".

"They watched a number of draft cuts and edits, and we gave them the right to select how they would be represented in the final film."

Ms Newell explained the reason why they decided to crowd fund the budget required for the production.

"Originally, Charlotte Mars and I met at university and decided to make this film. Nobody knew who we were because we had never received money (for a film) in Australia before, so we decided to crowd fund," she said.

"It was really wonderful because at the time we were the first film that raised such a big amount of money in Australia, and at 1500 individual supporters, the biggest number of individual funders in the country."

Screenings:

At the Star Court Theatre in Lismore, followed by Q & A with director Maya Newell and producer Charlotte Mars, this Friday, September 4, from 7pm, organised by Screenworks. 

The film will screen also at Pighouse Flicks in Byron Bay on Saturday, September 5,  at 6.30pm and at the Star Court Theatre in Lismore on Sunday, September 6, at 2.30pm and 5.30pm.  

For details visit the film's website.



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