Byron and Tweed police have been equipped with body-mounted video cameras, similar to this device, as part of a statewide roll out of Body Worn Video.
Byron and Tweed police have been equipped with body-mounted video cameras, similar to this device, as part of a statewide roll out of Body Worn Video. Contributed

Stall on body worn cameras for Byron cops

Update, 8am: BYRON Bay police will have to wait to wear body worn cameras until May when the technology is rolled out statewide, police confirmed.

Tweed/Byron Local Area Command Inspector Luke Arthurs said he and about 30 other Tweed Heads-based officers were trained and kitted out to wear Body Worn Video.

He said Body Worn Video was implemented for Tweed police for the upcoming Commonwealth Games at the Gold Coast in April. 

Insp Arthurs said he and other trained officers would be up-skilling the remainder of the Tweed force within the coming weeks. 

ORIGINAL STORY: BODY cameras have been rolled out to frontline police in the Tweed and Byron shires nearly three years after officers in Sydney were kitted out with the devices.

Tweed/Byron Local Area Command crime manager Brendan Cullen said Body Worn Video (BWV) would provide officers with a "contemporaneous, unequivocal account" of interactions between them and the public.

The officers attached their cameras to the chest of their uniforms for the first time last Friday. It came a day after footage on national television showed four officers pinning down a 16-year-old boy who they allege was drug-affected and violently resisted them in a Byron Bay laneway last month.

Detective Chief Inspector Cullen said the BWV would complement other strategies to tackle crime.

"It will be a great support to our officers and that's why they are keen to have the devices," Chief Insp Cullen said.

"The situations police get involved in are very difficult to put in writing but pictures tell a thousand words.

"Police are looking forward to getting them (BMV) out there and we've started that process."

He said there were "a lot of advantages" to the cameras that also serve as a "great evidence-gathering device" as well as saving police from relying on their memory about incidents.

While the devices would constantly film from an officer's point-of-view, they would need to switch it on to record and save footage.

The State Government has invested $4million in the past two years to implement BWV to three commands and the police transport command.



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