WIRES Carer and farmer Katy Stewart of The Pocket is concerned for native wildlife under attack from wild dogs.
WIRES Carer and farmer Katy Stewart of The Pocket is concerned for native wildlife under attack from wild dogs. Jay Cronan

Feral dog attacks continue

THE killing of livestock by wild dogs continues along the North Coast.

“More (animals) have died, but nothing has changed,” said Katy Stewart, WIRES carer and farmer of The Pocket.

This week, two sheep were killed at a home near the village of Crabbes Creek, and householders were kept awake at night on both sides of The Pocket valley by the howling of packs of dogs.

Ross Sigley, who runs a plantation business in The Pocket, has lived in the area all his life, and said he had never seen the dog problem as bad as it was at present.

He has lost a dozen sheep in the past eight months –‘which is all of them’, he said. Six were killed in one night at the end of last year.

Cattle are also bothered, he said, and he had lost a calf while it was being born.

Mr Sigley said the feral dogs were ‘fairly dingo-looking, with a touch of German Shepherd about them’.

He and his neighbours laid out baits every six months or so, but he wasn’t sure this was very effective.

As many as eight packs of feral dogs, some comprising 13 animals, are terrorising the region from Goonengerry in the south to Burringbar in the north.

Residents say the packs are devastating local wildlife and killing stock, working dogs and pets.

The packs of feral dingo-Alsatian crosses have even attacked people and terrorised children on their way to school.

Ms Stewart has limited the type of species she cares for, because ground-dwelling wallabies, quolls, possums and pademelons are likely to be killed almost immediately after they are released near her home.

Now she restricts herself to a few varieties of tree-dwelling possums.

The North Coast Livestock Health and Pest Authority (NCLHPA) will hold a meeting in Mullumbimby next week to inform people of the situation.

LHPA rangers, a National Parks and Wildlife pest management officer and rangers from Byron and Tweed councils will address landholders and community members.

The meeting will be held at Mullumbimby Ex-services Club on Tuesday, March 30 at 6pm.



Where the light rail is going next

premium_icon Where the light rail is going next

Fourth stage of Gold Coast light rail is a step closer to reality

WANTED: Do you know any of these men?

WANTED: Do you know any of these men?

Police are asking the community to help find these men

Wanted man frequents Lismore and Ballina areas

Wanted man frequents Lismore and Ballina areas

Police are trying to locate a man on five outstanding warrants

Local Partners